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mountain talk
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
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Hman
Florida
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July 28, 2013 - 1:32 pm
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I lived half of my life in Montana so I understood all the sayings lol. I was stationed in Louisiana once and holy cow, those people have their own language. It is true what they were saying...no one talks to their neighbors or cares about anyone else anymore. I hate it. Let's all move in with Pierre!!! One big ol' fiddlin' house! smiley-face-punching

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DanielB
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July 28, 2013 - 2:26 pm
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Sounded plain enough to me.  I don't live in the mountains, though.  This is the highlands of the top edge of the Appalachians.  (Highlands are the hills before they get big enough to call real mountains) Sounds like at least a kissin' cousin to how some older folks talked when I was growing up.

I think he missed a few words though..

Like: If'n

As in "If'n ye don't git outta yer mama's posie patch right now, she'll be like to tan yer hide fer ye."

"This young wine may have a lot of tannins now, but in 5 or 10 years it is going to be spectacular, despite the fact that right now it tastes like crude oil. You know this is how it is supposed to taste at this stage of development." ~ Itzhak Perlman

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Ginnysg
Southern California
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July 28, 2013 - 3:46 pm
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I love it!  My best friend lives across the world in Tennessee. 

When I went to visit she said things like "I'll carry you to the store."... uh.. can't you just drive me?  and when we got there we didn't use a shopping cart, it was a "buggy".

Of course my favorite thing was directions.  No one gave street names, it was all by landmarks.  "you go down the road a piece, and turn where old man Potter kilt the deer last year."  or "Turn left at the waffle house."

Of course she makes fun of us... she said everyone in California's first words are "yo dude!"

Thanks for the language lesson Barry!

“Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent” 

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KindaScratchy
Massachusetts
July 28, 2013 - 8:12 pm
Member Since: March 14, 2012
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OK, here's New England's answer to Tennessee's mountain people...Rhode Islanders (of which I'm one, by birth).

rofl

When the work's all done and the sun's settin' low,

I pull out my fiddle and I rosin up the bow.

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Feathers
Colorado, USA
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July 28, 2013 - 8:22 pm
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It all sounded quite normal to me. Just like some of my kinfolk.

And Ginny, when ya git up yonder a ways, don't fergit yer gonna wanna turn right where the ol' red barn yousta be. tongue

Enjoyed the video Barry, thanks for sharingsmile

"Music is what feelings sound like." ~ Author Unknown

 

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Feathers
Colorado, USA
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July 28, 2013 - 8:40 pm
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"Music is what feelings sound like." ~ Author Unknown

 

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
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July 28, 2013 - 8:47 pm
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Loved it ... Seem like good people to me!! 

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Kevin M.
Nicholson, Pa
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July 29, 2013 - 10:04 am
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Around here it doesn't mater if you know someone, you just say hi and wave. When my parents came here I was driving them around and told them a place was right down the road. 30 minutes minutes later we arived. Every time I would wave to someone they would ask who was that and I would tell them I don't know.

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dionysia
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July 29, 2013 - 10:43 am
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Around here it doesn't mater if you know someone, you just say hi and wave. When my parents came here I was driving them around and told them a place was right down the road. 30 minutes minutes later we arived. Every time I would wave to someone they would ask who was that and I would tell them I don't know.

 

Ha ha. My Grandma used to be the oldest woman in town. Now that the oldest man in town passed on, she is the oldest person in town. Her house is across the street from the school, and on the main drag through town. Summer evenings are for porch sittin, preferably while stemming beans or doing something else useful. One of my favorite things when I used to live with her was when folks would drive by and wave. Grandma would always say "Hi, don't know who you are, but I guess that's all right." Grandpa would just grumble "Who the hell was that? Don't know anybody round here anymore."

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Picklefish
Merritt Island, Fla
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July 29, 2013 - 11:40 am
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I can relate to these posts. I come from the only place in the world where there is no accent, since weall talk normal, and y'all talk funny. There's wesuns and yousuns among the nieces and cousins. You can hep yoself to a plate and even hit a secund heppin if you're hankering for it. 'Mere, means to come here, "closer" means your in for a whuppin. Yonder, a spell, neither and ma'am are all used. A dumplin is a large flat noodle what simmered in a pot with some yard bird. Usually served with greens. Growing up people would come and visit, usually round supper time. "Dinner" was only on Sundays. North Carolina will always be my home. It is Gods favorite place, he made the sky "Tar Heel" blue.

"Please play some wrong notes, so that we know that you are human" - said to Jascha Heifetz.

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Mad_Wed
Russia, Tatarstan rep. Kazan city
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August 2, 2013 - 5:57 pm
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Have to admit, that i don't understand all of it. I can understand what he's talking about, but what words he's saying separately...dunno

Best of all i understand people from UK and Canada. Even Europeans (even with an accent) are speaking understandable. LOL! But this is the matter of habit. 

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KindaScratchy
Massachusetts
August 2, 2013 - 7:17 pm
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Don't worry, Naska. These videos -- particularly the Rhode Island video -- are not the best examples of the English language. In fact, that's the point and why we think they're funny.

People in certain parts of the U.S. -- there's probably an example in every part of the country -- have very strong accents and very colorful expressions or idioms. We think they're funny because we hear them all the time and, if we're from that area, we know exactly what they mean, even if they're unintelligible to people from other places. It's part of the local flavor of our home towns.

Do you find that's true in Russia, too? I mean, in Russian or other languages spoken there?

dunno

 

When the work's all done and the sun's settin' low,

I pull out my fiddle and I rosin up the bow.

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Mad_Wed
Russia, Tatarstan rep. Kazan city
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August 3, 2013 - 5:00 pm
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KindaScratchy said
Don't worry, Naska. These videos -- particularly the Rhode Island video -- are not the best examples of the English language. In fact, that's the point and why we think they're funny.

People in certain parts of the U.S. -- there's probably an example in every part of the country -- have very strong accents and very colorful expressions or idioms. We think they're funny because we hear them all the time and, if we're from that area, we know exactly what they mean, even if they're unintelligible to people from other places. It's part of the local flavor of our home towns.

Do you find that's true in Russia, too? I mean, in Russian or other languages spoken there?

dunno

 

Not SO much. I mean between Russians there are differences in accents depending from area of living, but not that much.

Russia is a multicultural country with a LOT of different nations that have their own republics and languages. For example, i live in Tatarstan. Here are Tatar paople =). They speak Tatar language and of course some of them have accent when speak Russian (especially in the villages), that's normal. But it's more like i will speak English with Russian accent. It's kinda differences between Native-to-Russian but not so much Russian-to-Russian. =) 

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