FORUM

Please have a look at our Forum Rules. Lets keep this forum an enjoyable place to visit.

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
The most treasured and expensive violins ever...
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
Avatar
cdennyb
King for a Day, Peasant for many
Members

Regulars
March 4, 2012 - 11:34 pm
Member Since: February 13, 2012
Forum Posts: 1774
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

http://www.leroydouglasviolins.....lassic.htm

 

Here you will find a very healthy description of the best of the best of the instruments you all have a wish to play... These are truly the best indicator of violin craftsmanship & history of the world. Very educational reading.

One violin was owned and played for over 50 years by the same man, until it was sold for over $10 million to a Russian billionaire. I bet you can't begin to understand the feeling of letting such a valued and cherished thing leave your life. I know I can't.

"If you practice with your hands you must practice all day. Practice with your mind and you can accomplish the same amount in minutes." Nathan Milstein

Avatar
sdsalyer
Abingdon, VA
Advanced member
Members
March 5, 2012 - 9:22 am
Member Since: January 27, 2012
Forum Posts: 73
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

That's pretty cool.  Do these old violins not have sound posts or do the CT scans miss them somehow?

Avatar
Kevin M.
Nicholson, Pa
Members

Regulars
March 5, 2012 - 9:48 am
Member Since: September 10, 2011
Forum Posts: 1957
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Since CT scans are slices, where the slice was taken is not where the soundpost is so no soundpost in the scan.  I have been wanting to make an Nicolo Amati for som time now and was surprised at the back, how thick it is in the center and thinning out at the edges.

Avatar
cdennyb
King for a Day, Peasant for many
Members

Regulars
March 5, 2012 - 3:19 pm
Member Since: February 13, 2012
Forum Posts: 1774
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Did you read the part about the mathematical representation of the back? They have a link here to the math formula.

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/C.....cloid.html

It is very, very complex this 'making of a violin'. I admire your ability to make one Kevin. 

"If you practice with your hands you must practice all day. Practice with your mind and you can accomplish the same amount in minutes." Nathan Milstein

Avatar
Kevin M.
Nicholson, Pa
Members

Regulars
March 5, 2012 - 9:45 pm
Member Since: September 10, 2011
Forum Posts: 1957
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I was reading about this some time ago and was completely amazed

Avatar
springer
Honorary tenured advisor
Members

Regulars
March 10, 2012 - 2:42 pm
Member Since: January 5, 2012
Forum Posts: 525
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

What gets me is how did the first builders of violins get everything so right. Since they are dead I guess we can't just ask them.facepalm

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
March 11, 2012 - 11:03 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11717

My theory about that is that the great makers probably make them just as good though it will take many years before the sound matures. Also, a lot of judging instruments is in the head. If you know you are playing on a real Strad you automatically look for everything that is great with that instrument.

I have a news post about a test between great old Italian instruments and contemporary ones. I believe they tested a Guarnieri or Strad against the modern violins. The majority chose the modern violins as their favorite.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
springer
Honorary tenured advisor
Members

Regulars
March 11, 2012 - 1:49 pm
Member Since: January 5, 2012
Forum Posts: 525
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I saw the test you are talking about, it was kind of surprising. What is more cofusing is that a violin's sound matures, but I know it is true, my own violin is maturing, I can hear it.

 

Were the great ones considered "GREAT" in their day or long after?

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
March 11, 2012 - 10:52 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11717

Probably they were considered great but no one had an idea of just how great at the time. What do you think?

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
cdennyb
King for a Day, Peasant for many
Members

Regulars
March 11, 2012 - 11:36 pm
Member Since: February 13, 2012
Forum Posts: 1774
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

Since I've been playing on my old German violin, I can notice a sound almost like a reverb unit of the 70's on your old music players. The vibration has gotten more pronounced and now I notice a significant increase in the strings tonal vibrations.

I think it like the fact that I now play it instead of it spending all those years in a dark box in the rafters. LOL 

"If you practice with your hands you must practice all day. Practice with your mind and you can accomplish the same amount in minutes." Nathan Milstein

Avatar
Kevin M.
Nicholson, Pa
Members

Regulars
March 12, 2012 - 9:06 am
Member Since: September 10, 2011
Forum Posts: 1957
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

I must have been one of those cheap violins in my other life. As I mature I am falling apart.

Avatar
Sofia Leo
Lebanon, Oregon
Honorary advisor
Members

Regulars
March 12, 2012 - 5:45 pm
Member Since: April 6, 2011
Forum Posts: 464
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

Fiddlerman said
Probably they were considered great but no one had an idea of just how great at the time. What do you think?

 

Strads actually went out of fashion in the late 1700's as Stainers and their type became more popular for larger venues - the Strads could not project enough for the new musical styles. The efforts of one man, Luigi Tarisio, pretty much saved the Strads, et al, from becoming no more than legends. I wrote a blog post about it on The Fiddle Project.

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 231

Currently Online:
22 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Members Birthdays
sp_BirthdayIcon
Today kit, wisco kid
Upcoming Mad_Wed, Andrew, Prudence, ButteryStuffs, makinnoise

Top Posters:

coolpinkone: 3767

Mad_Wed: 2849

Barry: 2661

Fiddlestix: 2637

Oliver: 2439

DanielB: 2379

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 3564

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 16

Forums: 56

Topics: 6448

Posts: 80415

Newest Members:

MACJR, bo, EKBanjo, charlieD, Folky fiddler, Morgenes42

Administrators: Fiddlerman: 11717, KindaScratchy: 1651