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My Issues: Violin + Viola + Me = Bad Luck?
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Adaleona
Ohio, USA
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March 2, 2017 - 4:17 am
Member Since: March 1, 2017
Forum Posts: 35
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Hello!

 

To all of you whom are reading this...be prepared for questions galore. Okay...really only three...And here they are:

 

Q 1: I have a Chinese factory made (I have been complimented many times with this violin) unlabeled violin that was supposedly an outfit. We bought it off of craigslist years ago with a violin I'm assuming to be a Mendini or Cecilio (haven't seen it, so I wouldn't know), and just recently decided to pick it up after having reasons for quitting every once and awhile. Well, just recently I noticed one of the bows' corks was pulling out when I would tighten my bow. We took it to get fixed...the cork was, but the wooden plug keeping the bow hair in wasn't. Every time I tighten my bow, the wooden plug starts sliding out and no matter how many times I push it in...slides right back out. How can I fix this?

 

Q 2: I have a Dan Wall Stradivarius Copy Viola and when I got it new, the chin rest and tailpiece were cracked - poor instrument had been covered in a layer of dust from never being bought. So we had that repaired...well, instead of having a typical Guarneri style chin rest, I have a different one...I can't remember the style, but I noticed there is like a residue where he old chin rest was from the wooden mould. I have a small OCD for this (I love keeping my instruments looking absolutely gorgeous at all times) and wanted to know if there was any possible way to remove it?

 

Q 3: My final question! This is on my viola's carbon fiber bow. No clue what brand, but I decided to be stupid and inspect my instrument after I brought it home - okay...I wasn't expecting a viola as an early Christmas present... I wasn't thinking...And well, that's when I noticed the cracks on the tailpiece and chin rest. Well I also noticed that he carbon fiber bow was warped to the right at the tip (not badly, but noticeable) and the tip would tend to lean right if not corrected. This is another OCD I have. My two wooden bows for my violin are perfectly straight, but...my carbon fiber...no. I would really love to fix this if I could!

 

Thank you for your time!

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OldOgre
OhiO
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March 2, 2017 - 9:50 am
Member Since: March 15, 2014
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hello and welcome.

to answer q1.. if you can get the little block all the way out, use your rosin block and rub it on the sides of it and push it back in. the rosin should help keep it from slipping out.

q2.. not sure what you are saying here?

q3.. only thing you can do that I know of with carbon fiber is buy a new one.

hope this helps.

Happy playing.

With violins there is no fretting over the music.

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Adaleona
Ohio, USA
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March 2, 2017 - 10:54 am
Member Since: March 1, 2017
Forum Posts: 35
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So what I meant by question 2 was when you switch style chin rests and the chin rests is resting in a different spot then the original. The wooden mould that keeps the ebony/boxwood/rosewood from directly touching your violin and damaging it (all violins are of course shaped differently, so if the wooden mould wasn't underneath the violin, then I'm guessing the chin rest would have to be specifically fitted to the violin to keep the wood of the chin rest from damaging the violin with constant pressure of the chin). Well, the wooden mould left like some kind of mark on my viola, it's not visible but it's like some kind of residue or such and I don't know how I would remove it if I could.

 

For the carbon bow answer...just what I don't need. The bow was 200 plus a case which was 200 and the viola originally $3,200, but the luthier gave us half of the bow and half off the case since we got this for a Christmas present and was trying to sell more so he could give his workers a Christmas bonus. The luthier is a nice man and wanted to help us out, so I have nothing against him for the issues my viola encountered and the issue the bow had. I just wanted to see if I could somehow fix the warp by myself without having another visit down to the luthier (had about four total last year with my viola and violin combined). It's fine if I have to deal with it though.

 

Thank you for the reply!

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
March 3, 2017 - 9:07 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 12740

Adaleona said
Hello!

Hey there

Q 1: I have a Chinese factory made (I have been complimented many times with this violin) unlabeled violin that was supposedly an outfit. We bought it off of craigslist years ago with a violin I'm assuming to be a Mendini or Cecilio (haven't seen it, so I wouldn't know), and just recently decided to pick it up after having reasons for quitting every once and awhile. Well, just recently I noticed one of the bows' corks was pulling out when I would tighten my bow. We took it to get fixed...the cork was, but the wooden plug keeping the bow hair in wasn't. Every time I tighten my bow, the wooden plug starts sliding out and no matter how many times I push it in...slides right back out. How can I fix this?

If it's a Cecilio you should be able to see that on the label through the f-hole.
If the spread wedge inside the ferrule is coming out when you tighten the bow, the wedge is probably too long. Pushing it back in won't help. There is a slight chance that it's not big enough too. I wouldn't worry about it too much until it falls apart, if it does. If you want to try to fix it, just cut as much off the inner piece of the wedge as is popping out and then reinsert it. Alternatively, try to cut a new piece which fits better.

Q 2: I have a Dan Wall Stradivarius Copy Viola and when I got it new, the chin rest and tailpiece were cracked - poor instrument had been covered in a layer of dust from never being bought. So we had that repaired...well, instead of having a typical Guarneri style chin rest, I have a different one...I can't remember the style, but I noticed there is like a residue where he old chin rest was from the wooden mould. I have a small OCD for this (I love keeping my instruments looking absolutely gorgeous at all times) and wanted to know if there was any possible way to remove it?

You can remove the cork but probably not without seeing the damage over the rosin. It sticks to the varnish for a couple of reasons. One is the length of time that the chinrest has been clamped on the instrument and the other could be that the chin-rest was put on before the varnish was dry enough. In any case, new violins have softer varnish and cure over time. Even if the varnish is dry enough, the varnish is usually too soft in the beginning for that pressure.

To fix this, remove as much of the old cork as you can and as carefully as possible. I use my fingernail carefully.... I'm not sure what our luthiers use. I'll try to remember to ask them. After you remove it, you can try with a cleaner but most likely the varnish needs to be softened to fix it. This in itself is hard to learn. For an amateur, you may want to take a soft artist paint brush and some alcohol, we use 95% Everclear grain alcohol but rubbing alcohol should work. Brush it on very dry. Brush some on a piece of paper first to absorb the excess alcohol. Repeat this process over and over, carefully, and watch the messed up varnish smooth out if done correctly.

"Caution, I won't take responsibility for any errors made causing more damage."

Also, another possibility would be to use micro sand paper and wet sand it. Trouble is that it will most likely be flat afterwards. You can correct that with varnish if you are talented. 🙂

Q 3: My final question! This is on my viola's carbon fiber bow. No clue what brand, but I decided to be stupid and inspect my instrument after I brought it home - okay...I wasn't expecting a viola as an early Christmas present... I wasn't thinking...And well, that's when I noticed the cracks on the tailpiece and chin rest. Well I also noticed that he carbon fiber bow was warped to the right at the tip (not badly, but noticeable) and the tip would tend to lean right if not corrected. This is another OCD I have. My two wooden bows for my violin are perfectly straight, but...my carbon fiber...no. I would really love to fix this if I could!
 

You probably can't fix the carbon fiber bow. You can try by using a warm air gun to heat the stick and correct it but once again, not that easy. I've never done this with a carbon fiber stick and do not think it will work but let us know if you are successful. Usually they don't change shape much. The wooden sticks do. Wooden bows are made straight and cambered afterwards using friction heat or other variations of heat.

Thank you for your time!  

You got it!

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Adaleona
Ohio, USA
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Members
March 3, 2017 - 11:44 am
Member Since: March 1, 2017
Forum Posts: 35
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Hello!

Thank you so much for the reply! To clear up confusion, I actually don't own a Cecilio but for a good deal we had gotten a full sized (my violin) and a 3/4th violin - I'm assuming the 3/4th was a Cecilio or just a crap instrument. I don't know what kind of bows the Cecilio instruments come with but we somehow ended up with the 3/4th bow and it was Glasser - or so it said. I looked it up and there was absolutely no bow on their website that looked similar, so I honestly don't know. I will be posting pictures of my instruments and the story of how I got them and such.

To note, I will probably not be doing any of these repairs until I see if I get this job at a violin shop near me.  Question; will the rubbing alcohol remove only the rosin remains or the varnish?

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Adaleona
Ohio, USA
Member
Members
March 4, 2017 - 2:07 pm
Member Since: March 1, 2017
Forum Posts: 35
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Update:

 

Today we went to the violin shop near me and had taken the carbon fiber bow. My luthier looked it over and saw that the frog wasn't fit to the stick correctly. He said this was an odd repair, but he let me watch what he did and I learned something from it. Needless to say my bow is now fixed!

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
March 8, 2017 - 12:17 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 12740

Nice to hear.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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