FORUM

Please have a look at our Forum Rules. Lets keep this forum an enjoyable place to visit.

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Hello!
After advice on instrument for learning as an adult
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
Avatar
Calibri
Member
Members
October 27, 2016 - 5:20 pm
Member Since: October 27, 2016
Forum Posts: 3
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi, I'm new here. My boyfriend bought me an electronic violin last year and I've been trying to teach myself but find holding the violin painful on my collarbone and chin. 

I have been advised by a tutor that it is dangerous and would be virtually impossible to learn to play this particular instrument because it is too heavy for me. 

I weighed it and it is 700g which I understand is pretty heavy, as most seem to be 400-500g. So now I have to decide whether to give up my plans and sell the violin, or get an acoustic instrument to learn with a view to trying the electric once I've got the basics down.

Does anyone have any words of wisdom? I'm just very disappointed right now 🙁 

Avatar
damfino
oHIo, USA
Members

Regulars
October 27, 2016 - 8:37 pm
Member Since: July 23, 2015
Forum Posts: 875
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Don't give up on your dream to play the violin 🙂

I can't offer advice on the too heavy and dangerous aspect of your electric fiddle, I don't own one, but from what I've read electric fiddles are always (or almost always?) heavier than acoustic fiddles.

You could always get an acoustic violin to learn on. I'm not a large person, and have never found an acoustic too heavy, no matter which one I've played. 

~ I'm not torturing cats... I'm learning to play violin! ~

Avatar
Fran
Members

Regulars
October 27, 2016 - 9:53 pm
Member Since: June 8, 2016
Forum Posts: 125
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Yes don't give up on your dream.  I also suggest you get an acoustic violin.  You'll enjoy it!

Avatar
BillyG
Far North-west Scotland
Members

Regulars
October 28, 2016 - 5:05 am
Member Since: March 22, 2014
Forum Posts: 1644
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hello and WELCOME !   Please don't give up !!!!

I too have an EV as well as other acoustics.   I find that because the EV body is much thinner at the chin-end I had to pay great care to the choice of both chin-rest AND shoulder-rest for it to sit comfortably.   You shouldn't "really" be aware of the weight in your left hand and arm if the violin is sitting comfortably.   In theory you should be able to walk around, no hands on the violin, with it sitting comfortably against your chin, neck/shoulder.   This is MUCH easier to do on the larger-bodied acoustic - it just takes a bit more experimentation with chin and shoulder rests on the EV to find that "comfortable spot"

Having said that - there is much to be gained by playing the acoustic - tonally-wise it is quite a different instrument.   Equally - the EV comes into its own in certain genres with good effects and amplification.   My suggestion - if you can afford to keep the EV as well as purchasing an acoustic - do so !

Best of luck with your fiddling/violining journey thumbs-upthumbs-up

EDIT: I meant to say - if you feel that the instrument is unbalanced, you may also be sub-consciously tensing your left arm in the "fear of it dropping to the floor" - that will also tire you out un-necessarily - and that "developing ache" in your arm muscles may not be directly related to the instrument's weight....   just a thought...

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes.  

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

Avatar
Calibri
Member
Members
October 28, 2016 - 12:22 pm
Member Since: October 27, 2016
Forum Posts: 3
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thank you for your replies! 

Unfortunately despite trying various shoulder rests I cannot find a way of holding the EV without causing pain to my collarbone and chin. It is impossible for me to hold it up without any support of the neck 🙁 clearly this is not workable unless I only want to get as far as twinkle twinkle little star...

 

I'm waiting to hear if I can get lessons at a convenient time then will decide about rental or buying acoustic. 

Avatar
BillyG
Far North-west Scotland
Members

Regulars
October 28, 2016 - 12:36 pm
Member Since: March 22, 2014
Forum Posts: 1644
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Ahhh, OK - I was just mentioning it in case you hadn't experimented....   certainly if it is so uncomfortable and with no obvious solution, there is no point in un-necessarily hurting yourself or causing what may be long-term damage !

There should be no pain involved unless you are struggling with a known injury (LOL - my right hand pinkie was broken almost a year ago, I just adapted temporarily with a strange bow-hold - but - it finally seems to be settling down - still some nerve-damage that makes me go "OUCH" at times LOL ) - but for sure - you need to be fully comfortable with the violin under your chin.

I do still of course hope you don't give up - you will love and hate the journey in equal measure !!!!!   

Your plan sounds good - perhaps even consider a short-term rental ( no lessons, just get a hold of the thing for say a month - see how it feels )

Good luck to you !  hats_off

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes.  

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

Avatar
Calibri
Member
Members
October 28, 2016 - 6:03 pm
Member Since: October 27, 2016
Forum Posts: 3
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thank you Billy. Contending with an injury must be tough. Glad it's getting better now. 

 

Yes maybe I can try the rental one alone first but I got a bit scared by the tutor talking about damage and danger and getting into difficult habislts....presumably people do teach themselves the violin without crippling their necks and shoulders. A colleague's girlfriend has a violin she doesn't use so I'm waiting to hear if she's lend it to me to try...

 

If only my shoulder/chin area was less bony I wouldn't have a problem but unless I put in a lot of weight I dont see it changing much! 

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
October 31, 2016 - 7:51 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11702

Calibri said
Hi, I'm new here. My boyfriend bought me an electronic violin last year and I've been trying to teach myself but find holding the violin painful on my collarbone and chin. 

Welcome to the forum Calibri.
Unless you hold the violin correctly and with some kind of equipment to make it comfortable, it can be painful.
That it is painful on your collarbone in an indication that the hard back of the violin is sitting directly on your collarbone and that will be painful. There are several ways to take care of this. One is with a great should-rest. Another way is with some kind of sponge. You want to get the back of the violin completely off the collarbone and possibly the sponge or softer type shoulder-rest will equal the pressure on either side of your collarbone.

Next, "chin"-rest is really an improper term and I wish that the violin community would change the name to jaw rest. If the violin is held or supported by the chin, not only can it be painful but it can lead to neck and back issues.

Think of it as a jaw rest but mostly balance the instrument at your body, keeping it from slipping but hold it with your left hand/arm.

I have been advised by a tutor that it is dangerous and would be virtually impossible to learn to play this particular instrument because it is too heavy for me. 

Not really but proper technique is vital.

I weighed it and it is 700g which I understand is pretty heavy, as most seem to be 400-500g. So now I have to decide whether to give up my plans and sell the violin, or get an acoustic instrument to learn with a view to trying the electric once I've got the basics down.

This is the best solution for now. A lighter instrument will be easier for you to start on plus the sound is 10 times better as well. 🙂 Perhaps get an instrument with boxwood if possible as it is lighter. We (at Fiddlershop) also sell titanium hardware that you can exchange from the hardware on your instrument which makes the instrument even lighter.

Does anyone have any words of wisdom? I'm just very disappointed right now 🙁   

You are doing right by considering the correct options to get started in the right way, which will benefit you in the long run. Be content in that you are not making any mistakes that can lead to discomfort or pain in the future.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 231

Currently Online:
36 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Members Birthdays
sp_BirthdayIcon
Today harvestman, fiddlinmama
Upcoming HeadCheese, Mad_Wed, ButteryStuffs, kit, makinnoise

Top Posters:

coolpinkone: 3755

Mad_Wed: 2849

Barry: 2661

Fiddlestix: 2637

Oliver: 2439

DanielB: 2379

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 3555

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 16

Forums: 56

Topics: 6441

Posts: 80328

Newest Members:

elaine a, Mukundan, MyMing, dbsimon, stirlingite771, mdedmon

Administrators: Fiddlerman: 11702, KindaScratchy: 1651