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Audio/tuning
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Oliver
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June 15, 2011 - 3:58 pm
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I generally find that midi files as a backup are not in tune.  Wondering if others think so and what equipment they might use to play midi.  Is mp3 always better ?

I always avoid open "E" or "A" because my fingered notes are more in tune.  Does that make any sense ?

Are commercial CD's always in perfect pitch or do they mess with pitch for effect(s)?

 

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
June 15, 2011 - 10:43 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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Midi and Mp3 are two different things. Midi is not a recording rather digital information that can be used to play music. You can take a midi file and change the instrument information to play any midi instrument or instruments you want.

Mp3 is a compressed audio file and varies greatly in quality depending on how much you choose to compress it.

You make perfect sense. Your fingers are more in tune with what you played previously. Also, your strings may not always be perfectly tuned. All this means that you have a very good ear Oliver.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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myguitarnow
Laguna Beach
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June 17, 2011 - 10:48 pm
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As far as tuning goes, there is a iphone app called Cleartune and it works great. it works a lot better than the Cecilio tuner that came with my violin the other day. Lots of ear training goes along way. With guitar I don't even need a tuner anymore but always use one ;-). Always good to have a tuning fork with you so you don't need to rely on batteries and digital sounds. Boss brand makes some great tuners too. Hey, pianos go out of tune too.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
June 17, 2011 - 11:03 pm
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LOL, I have the free iPhone app called iTuna. Don't use it much but I like to show it off 🙂

I'll check out Cleartune sometime.

 

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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myguitarnow
Laguna Beach
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June 17, 2011 - 11:48 pm
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I have a bunch of iphone app tuners and for sure check out Cleartune app. It really works well. Back to Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star on violin.

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Oliver
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June 18, 2011 - 7:17 am
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I have used many different tuners but ALWAYS "retune" .... mostly by 5ths after I use the tuner.  I suspect that the harmonic frequency range of tuners may vary and , perhaps, the amount of damping is a factor also.
I also am suspicious of tuners that work via built-in microphone versus contact tuners. 
This is why I avoid open strings and would be happy if all music was in A flat.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
June 18, 2011 - 9:21 am
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For those who can, this is the best way to do it Oliver.

Good idea for most to use the tuner on the A, then tune the other strings by hearing perfect 5ths. The problem is that you must go back to the A because the tension changes affect the original pitch.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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David Burns
Winfield, Missouri
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June 25, 2011 - 1:02 am
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When you say "fifths" is this the fourth finger position? Fourth finger on "A" is "E"? How do you "tune down" for "D" and "G". Oh wait, I just answered my own question...fourth finger on "G" is "A", fourth finger on "D" is "G". As you say though the changing or increasing tension on the body of the instrument will throw the "A" out of tune. Forcing one to keep retuning.

 

Dave

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Oliver
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June 25, 2011 - 5:27 pm
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Not sure about fingers but fifths are:

G-D

D-A

A-E

(hum first 5 notes of any major scale and you will arrive at fifths)

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
June 26, 2011 - 12:48 am
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"Twinkle Twinkle" starts with a fifth after the repeated first note. Start "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" on each string to get an idea of what the fifth should sound like.

4th finger on the G = D
4th finger on the D = A

But the fourth finger won't help you tune since you may finger low or high. Harmonics could help you. I may demonstrate on a video later.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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David Burns
Winfield, Missouri
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June 27, 2011 - 1:36 am
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Like resonance, harmonic resonance? The amplification effect of two notes exactly the same? You go from hearing the note to feeling the note?

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
June 28, 2011 - 5:40 pm
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Not really. Although that was a great idea. Harmonics are when you touch the string super lightly in the middle while playing. The harmonic will sound a little like a whistle or flute. They can be more complex as well and we can play fingered harmonics by putting down one finger solid and another lightly. Usually 1 and 4. Two octave harmonics come from dividing the string by touching one 4th of the string.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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