FORUM

Please have a look at our Forum Rules. Lets keep this forum an enjoyable place to visit.

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Beginner's Question: How tight should the bow (hairs) be?
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
Avatar
thrashercharged
Kokomo, IN
Member
Members
December 22, 2011 - 4:40 pm
Member Since: December 20, 2011
Forum Posts: 12
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I've a beginner's question - how much tension should there be on the bow hairs?  I understand the bow should not be tightened so much that the wood is straight - I think it should still have some curve to it, and I've seen guidelines saying the hairs should be about 3/8 inch from the wood at the middle of the bow. or just enough so your pinky will fit between the hair and the bow, but that leaves a fair amount of latitude in tension.

 

I guess I'm asking how much "bounce" or "give" do you want in the hairs?  Do you want it loose enough so that when you bow hard, the hairs bend toward the wood, or tight enough that they don't? 

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
December 22, 2011 - 5:34 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11717

The 3/8" works great if you have plenty of arch in your bow. However if you do not you may not get away with that little of a space. It's a feel thing more than anything else. If your bow doesn't have much of an arch you may be better off getting a different bow.

If the bow is too loose you will actually be pressing the stick down on the strings while playing hard instead of the hair.

Too tight will give you a hard to control bounce.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
Oliver
NC
King
Regulars
December 22, 2011 - 6:51 pm
Member Since: February 28, 2011
Forum Posts: 2439
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I am much too impatient to negotiate with my bow.  Therefore, I weigh the force of the bow by pressing down the hair until it actually touches the bow BUT I do this on my wife's Weight Watcher scale.  My bow is most happy at 9 to 10 oz. 

I only do this once in a while to check my own "calibration" and I'm pretty good at it by now. Double stops want about 0.5 oz. less.

dancing

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
December 22, 2011 - 10:51 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11717

That is interesting Oliver. You have the mind of an engineer. That's for sure. smile

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
Oliver
NC
King
Regulars
December 23, 2011 - 9:22 am
Member Since: February 28, 2011
Forum Posts: 2439
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have a very simple($) version of that and I will tell you what it is after allowing a few months for you to get all your other ventures under control cool

coffee2

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Avatar
thrashercharged
Kokomo, IN
Member
Members
December 23, 2011 - 10:07 am
Member Since: December 20, 2011
Forum Posts: 12
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sorry if this gets posted twice, I just replied and answered the math question and it appears my reply got lost... so trying again.

 

I dug up my precision scale and tried this.  (10 oz = about 280 grams right?)  I assume you're setting the bow on the scale at the point where the hair and bow are the closest (near the midpoint, at the point of greatest recurve?)  And you're pushing down until the hair touches the bow, tightening the hairs and measuring the force (well, actually not force as that'll be in newtons but anyway) until it meets your spec?  I did that and set it to your spec and it's a tad looser than what I've been doing, but I've been suspecting that I've been tightening my bow a little too much.

 

>Double stops want about 0.5 oz. less.

 

What are double stops?  I've seen this mentioned a lot and I've searched but come up empty.  Actually, all my searches come up empty, maybe I'm doing something wrong?

Avatar
Oliver
NC
King
Regulars
December 23, 2011 - 1:10 pm
Member Since: February 28, 2011
Forum Posts: 2439
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Double stops are 2 strings at one time.  Sometimes called a "chord".  Lazy bow hair makes it a little easier to do two strings at once.

10 oz. is not magic and, on rechecking, I found it a tad loose. 

I do this simply to reduce variables because I want to get consistent bow performance and I HATE to start a practice session where everything has changed overnight.

I did develop a feel for the right pressure after a few weeks of trials and there is a relatively small window for best bow tension.

coffee2

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 231

Currently Online:
27 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Members Birthdays
sp_BirthdayIcon
Today kit, wisco kid
Upcoming Mad_Wed, Andrew, Prudence, ButteryStuffs, makinnoise

Top Posters:

coolpinkone: 3767

Mad_Wed: 2849

Barry: 2661

Fiddlestix: 2637

Oliver: 2439

DanielB: 2379

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 3564

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 16

Forums: 56

Topics: 6448

Posts: 80415

Newest Members:

MACJR, bo, EKBanjo, charlieD, Folky fiddler, Morgenes42

Administrators: Fiddlerman: 11717, KindaScratchy: 1651