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Beginners - what book(s) are you using (if any)?
What book(s) are you using (if any)?
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RedViolin
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January 20, 2015 - 6:17 pm
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As a child, I got up to the Etude (12) in Suzuki volume 1. I can tell, even though it was a long time ago, because I never really learned to read sheet music, and my pencil notations are still visible! (Even worse, I can identify now that quite a lot of them are wrong!)

Some friends gave me Strictly Strings book 1 for my birthday this year, and this is what I have been working on recently. I really like the approach used (it seems more suitable for an adult) and to my pleasant surprise, I have been able to do away with penciling the note letters in fairly quickly. (This may not be a direct result of the book, it could just be that I have developed somewhat since my childhood - one would hope, at least!) Best of all, the book seems to work well with Fiddlerman's videos. I'd been able to find quite a few video tutorial series on YouTube, but after you've completed, for example, Twinkle, I was left confused as to where to turn next - as a newbie, I had no idea what, for example, pizzicato or staccato or slurs were, and which I should attempt first.  This has given me somewhat of a developmental "curriculum" to follow - a framework around which to fit my video lessons.

I was wondering what books other beginners are using (if any)?

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ElisaDalViolin
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January 20, 2015 - 7:14 pm
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When I started, my teacher introduced me to A New Tune a Day  books 1 and 2 by Sarah Pope. I loved the books, they are well structured, include a cd and feature well known tunes which I think it's a plus to motivate students in this phase. I finished them quickly and started the Oscar Rieding concerto afterwards. 

If I remember more books I shall post the title for you smile

 
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Rob C
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January 20, 2015 - 7:41 pm
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the first book my instructor uses is titled Essential Elements for strings. pretty basic. Seems like a good start.

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wookieman
Tennessee, USA
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January 20, 2015 - 8:50 pm
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I've been through EE for strings book 1.

I'm currently working through Suzuki Book 1 and The O'Connor Method Book 1.

If I were taking lessons, I would definitely prefer the Suzuki or O'Connor method books to the EE books. If you are learning on your own, the EE books explain a little more when it comes to new techniques, etc.

That last note being said, there is LOTS of help available for the Suzuki method via YouTube. This channel has been extremely helpful for me:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvz9Whj9YX81dbk3-kiiMzw

There is no failure, only results.

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Jacques
San Diego
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January 20, 2015 - 8:50 pm
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Rubank collection:

Introducing the Positions Volume one and two. (To master the entire fingerboard. [vol 1 does third and fifth position] [vol 2 does second, fourth, sixth, seventh, et cetera])

Devoloping Double-Stops. (For grasping octaves, thirds, fourths, sixths, and tenths)

String Companions duet collection volume one (to practice melodic scores)

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Jacques
San Diego
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January 20, 2015 - 9:00 pm
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A rare book that your local major city library might have is called "technique is memory". This books goes through positions 1-7 in every single key known to man in 109 pages. It's easy to play because 4/7 of the music is identical in its finger patterns. The challenge is to hit all of the sharps and flats. 

I suppose if you're  practicing to perform a serious piece in D minor you can reference this book and practice the D minor section in order to learn where to play B flat on the fingerboard with the occasional C sharp. (D minor means B flat and with some C sharp)

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Ripton
Vermont, Massachusetts or somewhere in between
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January 20, 2015 - 10:01 pm
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I grabbed Brian Wicklund, mostly because I like the music (old time American Fiddle Music). While it's not the best for instruction, it did have a CD so I can learn both by ear and sight reading. Intonation.. well that's another story. lol

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RedViolin
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January 21, 2015 - 3:28 am
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Thanks @ElisaDalViolin, @Rob C, @Jacques, and @Ripton,those sound like great recommendations. Jacques' suggestions sound especially good for developing beyond the absolute beginner stage. I'll keep an eye out for "Technique is Memory", but no luck so far.

@wookieman thank you so much for the Suzuki method YouTube channel. A few years ago when I thought I might take up the violin again, I scoured the internet for sample play-throughs of the Suzuki pieces to no avail (and gave up). I'm very motivated to try and get through the whole thing now! I've spent a little bit of time this afternoon erasing my childish (and often incorrect) doodlings of the letters from Suzuki volume 1, ready to play :)

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
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January 21, 2015 - 1:14 pm
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I started with the Essential Elements books and I love them.  As a beginner on my own with no teacher, I didn't get far in the suzuki books.  I wish, I could have had a teacher and learned Suzuki lessons.

Good luck with whatever you choose.  

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Shane
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January 21, 2015 - 1:20 pm
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I'm almost finished with Essential Elements:  String Builder Book I.  I've liked it, and found it very helpful.  My teacher says we'll next be moving to Suzuki book I. 

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rockinglr33
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January 21, 2015 - 11:17 pm
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Hey redviolin!

Well i can only say what i've used. I started with the essential elements book 1 for violin. I am finally finished with it for the most part. Though it got me going, once i felt good enough at sight reading i grabbed up some other sheet music to play around with which was a blast and kept me entertained. I know just following and instruction book is kinda boring for me so i have to keep the challenge up somehow.

I tried useing the mark o'connor books but i could hold my interest with it. I think it would work great for a young kid but i dunno it was almost to simple for me.

i also bought fiddle playing for the complet ignamorious (spelling?) and thats been a fun step away from classical and into fiddling that was a blast for me.

Now i'm working on Essential elements book 2 and then branching out and learning Lord of the rings sheet music just for fun, and some shifting and double stops. Did i mention i have to keep myself entertained? haha. It probably takes me longer to learn this way but meh its fun but a blast for me.

Lead me, Follow me, or get out of my way!

             ~General George S. Patton

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Schaick
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January 23, 2015 - 12:43 pm
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I could read music before I started in with violin lessons so it was easy for me to start with the Suzuki book 1 but moved to the Brian Wicklund volumes 1 and 2 because I really enjoy the Old Time and Bluegrass tunes.

That first year I did take lessons every other month to make sure I wasn't picking up any bad habits.

Violinist start date -  May 2013  

Fiddler start date - May 2014

FIDDLE- Gift from a dear friend. A 1930-40 german copy, of a french copy of a Stradivarius.  BOW - $50 carbon fiber. Strings - Dominants with E Pirastro Gold string.

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RedViolin
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February 18, 2015 - 4:04 am
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@coolpinkone I think you're right that Suzuki would be better with a teacher, and easier if you can read music too, @Schaick. I'm doing my best to try and learn reading, which is something I never really learned or became able to do when I was learning as a child. Thanks for your reply too @rockinglr33, you've mentioned some books I hadn't heard of!

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