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Slipping Pegs
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Rose
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January 17, 2018 - 11:24 am
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I've had my Fiddlerman Concert Violin for about 2 months now and I've realized that the pegs have begun to slip out of tune pretty often- more often than in the beginning. Have any of you experienced that and know how to fix it?

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Charles
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January 17, 2018 - 1:40 pm
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First thought is to shove in harder when you're tuning. That's critical to getting them to hold. (Cheapest option, but also one you've probably already tried.)

Second thought is to use some peg compound on them.  Basically, peg compound has just the right stickiness to move when you put pressure on it, and not move when you don't. It's just not very strong, which is why you put it on the the pegs. Biggest downside of trying peg compound it that you have have to unstring and restring the violin to apply it. Make sure you do just one string at a time. You want to keep the overall tension on the violin as close to normal as is practical.

Third option - switch to geared pegs. That's why I did. I prefer Wittner's, but some people prefer Perfection Pegs. Either get the job done. (Since the tightness of the Perfection pegs is adjusted by pushing them in or pulling them out like normal pegs, they can slip sometimes if they're not adjusted to be tight enough. (You don't make the adjustment but once in a blue moon, but you may have to at some point.)) The higher gear ratio of the Wittners make that unnecessary. They're easy to turn, but hold solidly. (This is the most expensive option, and will also require restringing the violin.)

Last option, contact Fiddlershop and make arrangements to ship it to them to be worked on. Their instruments have a lifetime warranty for that kind of stuff.

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Rose
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January 17, 2018 - 1:54 pm
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Thanks for responding, Charles. Those geared pegs are calling my name but I'm going to wait till I progress before spending that much money. For now, I'm going to try to push the pegs in harder and if that doesn't work then I'll take your advice and contact Fiddlershop.

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Charles
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January 17, 2018 - 3:22 pm
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I was just reading another thread where they mentioned that low humidity could make pegs slip, too.  So you might want to check the humidity of your house/apartment.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
January 18, 2018 - 12:54 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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Rose said
I've had my Fiddlerman Concert Violin for about 2 months now and I've realized that the pegs have begun to slip out of tune pretty often- more often than in the beginning. Have any of you experienced that and know how to fix it?  

It's most likely do to the climate. Do you live in a cold dry area?

Try testing the tension of your pegs by tuning back a bit and twisting right and left while pushing in with your other hand supporting the scroll until you feel it's stiff enough that it won't slip. Then slowly bring it up to pitch with the same tension and inwards pushing.

Our violins are set up to be smooth and even but violin pegs are conical and it's an art to learn to apply the adequate tension. Sometimes people are scared to press too much.

If the pegs are not smooth, please let me know and I'll send you a free peg compound stick.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Rose
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January 22, 2018 - 1:52 pm
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I live in New York, which is pretty cold but not so dry.

Lately, it hasn't been slipping so that's good! But I plan on changing the strings soon so I'll see what happens then. 

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
January 23, 2018 - 2:28 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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You don't need to wait until you change strings, just loosen one string and push hard while moving back and forth slowly to see if the peg tightens up and remains smooth.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Irv
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January 23, 2018 - 10:05 pm
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Hi Rose (and others).  It has been very cold in New York (and elsewhere) this winter.  Relative humidity is completely temperature dependent (warm air can hold a lot more moisture than cold air).  A relative humidity of even 100% in 0 F air is practically no moisture at all.

The good thing about a violin in this weather is that they are relatively small and they do not expand and contract as much as a cello or double string bass, and the hide glue that holds them together should give way before the top and bottom plates crack, but they certainly can and will crack.  I definitely favor the use of a humidifier in the case, as well as mopping the floor.  You might want to shower without an exhaust fan on the very cold days as well!

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MrYikes
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January 24, 2018 - 3:13 am
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Its the heat in the home that is drying the air.  In my home in September the humidity can reach close to 80%, in early January it was 38%.  I have a humidifier but chose not to use it, preferring a pan of water set under my violins.  The pegs used to spin in the middle of the night causing the cats to jump really high.  The pegs have stayed in place this winter and the violins are sounding very nice again.

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damfino
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January 24, 2018 - 9:57 am
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I agree that it sounds like your heater is most likely drying out your violin, causing the peg slips. The fiddle I keep in a case with a case humidifier does fine, but the couple I have hanging on the wall for easy access are all out of tune from slipping pegs. 

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