FORUM

Please have a look at our Forum Rules. Lets keep this forum an enjoyable place to visit.

A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Wardrobe
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
Avatar
Oliver
NC
King
Regulars
April 1, 2011 - 1:43 pm
Member Since: February 28, 2011
Forum Posts: 2439
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have paid a lot of attention recently to supporting the violin with the collar bone.  In any case, I am keeping the violin closely tucked in.
However, I now find that I have a hard time maintaining position if I'm wearing a shirt, particularly a heavy shirt such as flannel.
In addition, Fiddlerman videos use a T-shirt but this can not be formal attire for all gigs (?)

I have also read that some players insist on actual skin contact to control position.
( wearing what ?)

Advise ?

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
April 2, 2011 - 12:50 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11701

LOL, no, t-shirt is not the right attire for hardly any of my gigs.
The red round pad that I have under the violin is there to keep the violin from sliding around and that is basically all. I barely support my violin in that way.

You should not put yourself in the position in which you are dependent upon a certain attire to be able to play violin. You may  be gripping it too hard. I think rather than supporting the violin you need to keep it placed and balanced.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
Oliver
NC
King
Regulars
April 2, 2011 - 8:17 am
Member Since: February 28, 2011
Forum Posts: 2439
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Curiosity.

Was there ever a period when you used a shoulder rest ?

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
April 2, 2011 - 8:41 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11701

When I first started to play I had one of these half moon things.

I did as a student, test the more common shoulder rests such as the Kun but never got attached to them. My biggest problem with them was that I would squeeze too much and they would fall off. I guess I never took the time to get use to it.

I am not against them at all. I have coached violinists that hold the violin much better with than without, and have seen great soloist play with all types of SR's.

Whatever can aide you in holding the violin properly and comfortably without added tension is good. We are all built differently and need equipment to suit our body.

 

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
fiddlefaddle
Member
Members

Regulars
April 5, 2011 - 11:51 pm
Member Since: January 12, 2011
Forum Posts: 34
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I remember those shoulder rests. They were kind of popular when I was learning before they came up with all these fancy shoulder rests.

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
April 6, 2011 - 5:46 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11701

You're right, I haven't seen that many people using them lately.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
GennaLea
Western New York
Regular advisor
Members

Regulars
August 21, 2011 - 12:52 am
Member Since: August 20, 2011
Forum Posts: 141
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

My niece's teacher gave her a 1 inch thick sponge for a shoulder rest. I watch her hold her violin and it just seems to get in the way for her and make it slippery for her. I'm wondering if she even needs it at all or if she should try playing without anything. I play mine without anything without any problems (as of right now anyway).

Avatar
myguitarnow
Laguna Beach
Pro advisor
Members

Regulars
August 21, 2011 - 1:21 am
Member Since: June 15, 2011
Forum Posts: 1094
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I don't use a shoulder rest. The ones that came with my violins are uncomfortable no matter how I try to adjust them. I have been really comfortable using a cleaning cloth bunched up and held by a rubber band so my fiddle doesn't slip off my shoulder. Plus my cleaning cloth is right there when I'm done playing.

Avatar
Robyn.fnq
Queensland, Australia
Honorary tenured advisor
Members

Regulars
August 21, 2011 - 4:04 am
Member Since: July 7, 2011
Forum Posts: 577
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I've also often had an issue with (or without) my shoulder rest.  I've just never been comfortable either way, and it bothers me that I need to keep shifting it up my shoulder when it slides.  I tried the sponge, which was more comfortable, but still migrated downhill.  There's no music shop for about 400km, so it's not convenient to go 'try one on' for fit.

What I really think is wrong, is that I'm too new to playing and don't have the comfort yet.  I still have a severely 'grippy' left thumb, and trying to play vibrato just slams the violin into my neck repeatedly.

All these problems will resolve, I'm sure, when I get it together.  I'm hoping that one day it will 'click' and life will become easier.

Ho hum ...

fish   fish   fish   fish

If you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
August 21, 2011 - 9:31 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11701
10sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

I firmly believe that finding the correct chin-rest first is more important than deciding whether or not you should have a shoulder rest. Once you feel the comfort in holding the violin so that it doesn't slide without gripping too hard, you can begin to experiment with what solution you will want under the violin.

I highly recommend finding the most comfortable chin-rest first, raising it if necessary to suit your neck hight, then trying with no, or just enough of a pad to keep the violin from feeling slippery. If it doesn't feel like it will slip you won't feel too much need for gripping. Avoid all extra energy and tension to endure longer and more enjoyable practice and play sessions.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
Pikachu
Pallet Town
Regular advisor
Members

Regulars
September 7, 2011 - 3:27 pm
Member Since: April 6, 2011
Forum Posts: 154
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

How do you go about finding a good chin rest? Do you just have to buy a bunch, install them, and try them out? I've been looking online for one that's more comfortable for me, but they all look the same.

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
September 7, 2011 - 4:48 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11701
12sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

I think that this would be the best solution but their prices are outrageous. 

http://www.chinrests.com/kit.htm

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 231

Currently Online:
39 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Members Birthdays
sp_BirthdayIcon
Today lakelivr
Upcoming HeadCheese, Mad_Wed, ButteryStuffs, harvestman, fiddlinmama, kit, makinnoise

Top Posters:

coolpinkone: 3755

Mad_Wed: 2849

Barry: 2661

Fiddlestix: 2637

Oliver: 2439

DanielB: 2379

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 3554

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 16

Forums: 56

Topics: 6441

Posts: 80313

Newest Members:

Mukundan, MyMing, dbsimon, stirlingite771, mdedmon, coreshanethi

Administrators: Fiddlerman: 11701, KindaScratchy: 1651