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Will the shape of an electric spoil you for acoustic?
Will practicing on an electric with no shape like an acoustic interfere with how you play an acoustic violin?
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PopFiddle
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May 12, 2014 - 1:13 pm
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I'm looking at the cecilio electrics as a way of practicing without going on display for the whole apartment complex. But they come in a variety of shapes. Does practicing on different shapes effect your performance on an acoustic? I especially like the minimalist CVN-4 models because they take up so little space, but not if they make me useless on an acoustic.

Will the shape of an electric spoil you for acoustic?

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Barry
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May 12, 2014 - 2:00 pm
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the shape isnt going to spoil you, but the technique on getting a good sound is. I dont think theres anything wrong with practicing on the electric as long as youre practicing on the acoustic also

There is no shame in playing twinkle, youre playing Mozart

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DanielB
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May 12, 2014 - 2:16 pm
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I play both electric and acoustic, and even though my electric is very non-trad in shape, I don't think it "spoils" anything. LOL No more so than playing an electric guitar will harm one's ability to play acoustic guitar. (I do both of those as well)

However...There are differences between solid body electric violins and acoustic violins. While most techniques and etc you practice on one will help with the other, you pretty much have to practice on both if you want to be able to play both. There is a lot of overlap in what will work, but they are not identical any more than electric and acoustic guitars are.

"This young wine may have a lot of tannins now, but in 5 or 10 years it is going to be spectacular, despite the fact that right now it tastes like crude oil. You know this is how it is supposed to taste at this stage of development." ~ Itzhak Perlman

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Mad_Wed
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May 12, 2014 - 3:21 pm
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If You are a beginner - then it's possible, if You don't switch between them. I had Brahner EV-503, it's has the shape of "S". I played it for about 6 months without switching between violins (electric/acoustic) and i've got problems with playing on the E string on an acoustic one - my hand went too low and i always touched with the bow hairs the edge of the acoustic violin. So, if You are concerned about it - CEVN-1 or CEVN-2, or switch the violins, or just pay attention to it.

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Hman
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May 12, 2014 - 3:28 pm
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You should just get an acoustic and get a full mute if the only reason for the electric is so you can practice quietly.

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DanielB
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May 12, 2014 - 3:39 pm
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LOL Now that is an interesting attitude. Kinda like saying "The only reason for an acoustic is if there is a power failure.."

Some folks do prefer to play electric, some prefer acoustic. I like both, personally.

"This young wine may have a lot of tannins now, but in 5 or 10 years it is going to be spectacular, despite the fact that right now it tastes like crude oil. You know this is how it is supposed to taste at this stage of development." ~ Itzhak Perlman

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Barry
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May 12, 2014 - 3:50 pm
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@DanielB The acoustic and electric guitars are very much different instruments even in the way they are played. Ive been playing guitar for over 40 years and have played with some great guitarists here in Nashville. You are the FIRST to ever make that statement

http://fiddlerman.com/wp-content/forum-smileys/jimi-hendrix.gif

PS. And if your goal was to be a acoustic guitarist, and all you played was electric, yes it would hurt you, much the same with the fiddle

There is no shame in playing twinkle, youre playing Mozart

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DanielB
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May 12, 2014 - 4:23 pm
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@Barry: I don't think it would hurt you so much as you'd still have some learning curve to be able to sound good on acoustic. If you figured you were pretty good on electric and figured you could just pick up an acoustic and do just as well, right off the bat?.. Might be in for a rude awakening. LOL Same thing the other way around.

I'm still a couple years shy of the 40 yr mark on guitar, myself. But yeah, electric and acoustic are different instruments in a lot of ways. One is not just a substitute for the other. They are closely enough related that much of the work you do on electric or acoustic will help with the other. But they just aren't the same.

If your goal is to sound good on acoustic, then you want to get an acoustic. If you want to be good on electric, then you need an electric. If you want to get to at least passable on both, well then you're gonna be busy. And you'd need both. LOL

"This young wine may have a lot of tannins now, but in 5 or 10 years it is going to be spectacular, despite the fact that right now it tastes like crude oil. You know this is how it is supposed to taste at this stage of development." ~ Itzhak Perlman

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Barry
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May 12, 2014 - 6:31 pm
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and then they sneak in the wider necked classical guitar facepalm

birthday_balloon

There is no shame in playing twinkle, youre playing Mozart

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PopFiddle
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May 13, 2014 - 1:26 pm
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Thanks all for replying.

I also have some guitar experience. I agree that the difference between the electric and acoustic guitar are a bit more than between electric and acoustic violins. There is the difference in necks, and also the difference in strings.

Since sound is generated much the same way between electric and acoustic violins, I am not so much worried about differences in string performance. Although being able to hear what the string is doing is different between electric and acoustic violins. That would be something to watch.

I was more concerned about the shape and maybe the weight.

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Mad_Wed
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May 14, 2014 - 5:53 pm
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PopFiddle said

... I agree that the difference between the electric and acoustic guitar are a bit more than between electric and acoustic violins.

A little addition. Fingerboard of the electric shaped a little flatter that the acoustic (the arch is bit less). That affects the intonation in very high positions (mostly 6th and higher). Almost unnoticeable especially for non profesional, that's why i didn't mention it before, but because this discussion going to such comparisons i think it might be interesting as well.. My teacher once prepared for a concert on her Yamaha SV-120, and the next day, playing on her acoustic one - she was out of tune (not that much to ruin a performance, but quite uncomfortable). So now she tells students that if they want to play electric - then they should play mostly electric, because it's quite two different instruments. She doesn't allow me to play scales on electric one, because usually we play them to the end of the fingerboard (4 octaves).
I don't think that it makes much difference for me on my level, so maybe it could be interesting for someone else (not me, LOL!)...

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