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Violin got stolen
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (1 votes) 
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SecondFiddle
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May 10, 2014 - 8:39 pm
Member Since: March 30, 2014
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About two weeks ago when I went to get my violin I couldn't find it. I looked everywhere in my apartment, my car, my workplace and my godparents' house before noticing that the lock on one of my car doors wasn't locking with the others. It then dawned on me that when I was carrying my other stuff in the night I got home from work I must have left it in my car accidentally and someone came by, found that door unlocked, and took it.

So, I'm looking into buying one and have no idea where to start. I had gotten that violin back in February from a friend for $20, because he didn't like the way it sounded. I've taken lessons for two and a half months and was planning on keeping that fiddle for at least a year before looking into a better one just to make sure I was going to keep up with it.

There are plenty of good local stores around me and I've had good experiences with the two I've visited already (one didn't even charge me for the string I went in to have replaced) and I'd like to buy locally if I can afford it. However, I know nothing about violin manufacturers and which to avoid or look at. The ones here look nice and the reviews are all good so it might be worth saving up for (as of next week I'll have $220 saved from my now canceled lessons and birthday money).

One store I looked at online had various Barcelona sets normally priced $215-299 for $89-120 which included cases, strings, rosin, etc. There was one on craigslist: a Fever 4/4 violin which came with an amp, case, rosin, etc. that's within my current price range too, but I don't know if that would be good or not.

I don't know if this an appropriate topic for this forum or not as I just signed up not too long ago and hadn't gotten involved in anything yet, but any advice I could get would be great!

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OldOgre
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May 10, 2014 - 9:02 pm
Member Since: March 15, 2014
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Here for what its worth is my 2 cents, wait that would be worth 2 cents...lol
Ok stay away from heat formed plywood violins, usually $40 range.
I have a Cecilio CVN-EAV bought on Ebay for $79.95
it has real spruce top carved, maple back and ribs. Ebony fitting, not a strat but great for student. comes with a really nice case. You might want to look at one of these, oh you want to change strings as soon as possible.

With violins there is no fretting over the music.

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SecondFiddle
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May 10, 2014 - 9:07 pm
Member Since: March 30, 2014
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Thanks! I'm definitely not looking for a strad, just something I can learn on. And yeah the people at the store I took my old one to told me that when they saw it still had the starter strings minus the E. I'll look into that.

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rockinglr33
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May 10, 2014 - 10:10 pm
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hey second fiddle,
I'm sorry about your violin getting stolen :( on the flip side, looking for a new violin is always fun :D I'd say go to the stores and look at the ones within your budget, or ones you'll be able to save up for, and find one that fits you. By that, one that you like the sound of and the feel of. Your preferences might change as you play, but then you can always upgrade. Don't be afraid to shop online. I've heard great things about the FM violins. Since you like buying locally when possible i'd say just go and ask about them. Most will be more then happy to play them for you. I'd say pick the ones in your price range, turn around and have them play them for you, using only your ears to pick the ones you like the most. Then play them, and see which ones feel the best! Good luck!!

Lead me, Follow me, or get out of my way!

             ~General George S. Patton

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Oliver
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May 10, 2014 - 10:58 pm
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Did I hear anyone say Fiddlershop.com ?
Regular violins for sale from, beginner and up.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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SecondFiddle
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May 10, 2014 - 11:20 pm
Member Since: March 30, 2014
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Oliver:

I'm considering FM fiddles, I'm just wanting to shop around before I settle on something and am looking for advice on what to avoide, etc.

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Oliver
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May 11, 2014 - 7:28 am
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I may be trying to say that when you find the cheapest violin, don't buy it! There are bargain violins at less than the Fiddlershop line but Fiddlershop is still within the economy range. Working with a dealer you can trust is very important.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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DeeLight41
North Carolina
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May 14, 2014 - 12:49 pm
Member Since: April 28, 2014
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If you have pawn shops in your area, maybe you could find a good inexpensive one. Maybe you would find yours....It's worth a try imo.

Patience is necessary to learn the violin: But let patience have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing.-James 1:4
When I get discouraged: I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.-Philippians 4:13

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rczeien
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May 14, 2014 - 1:43 pm
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If you get a poor quality violin, what you save on the violin, I suspect you'll spend the money you save on extra lessons, as it will slow your progress. I'm just a beginner, but from starting with a Medini and moving to a fidderman, the difference is night and day.

I wasted a lot of time before just messing with the instrument, and if the sound is no good, you won't know if you placed your finger wrong, you are holding the bow too tight, or if it's just the violin itself.

Many violin shops will do rentals. Just be aware the rent to own deals are about like the rent-a-center deals. You will pay $400 dollars to rent-to-own a $150 dollar violin.

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Crazymotive
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September 8, 2014 - 3:48 pm
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Not only is the violin important but you also want a reputable luthier to set it up properly. This includes ebony or rosewood pegs that are properly fitted so that they turn smoothly yet hold their place firmly. Soundpost adjustment is also critical and can mean the difference between a violin that has a rich and full bodied tone versus a flat and tinny tone. A good Luthier should know how to properly adjust the sound post for best sound quality. A good set of strings. Many modestly priced student grade violins come with a set of stock strings that just don't sound right. Different violinists prefer different brands and types of strings but, at the very least start off with a good set or reputable strings, i.e. D'addario, Pirastro's , etc. Over time you will decide which type of sting you prefer. Also a well fitted bridge is very important. the feet of the bridge should be shaped so they rest firmly and completely on the surface of the violin and the bridge itself should be cut and fitted so that it provides a comfortable string height and spacing.

Whether you get a $100 student violin or a $500 student violin a proper setup can mean the difference between an pleasant learning/playing experience versus an unpleasant and frustrating experience.

As for the violin itself at the very least it should have a real spruce top (not plywood or pressed wood), maple sides and back, a real ebony fingerboard, and, actual real inlaid purfing (as opposed to painted on purfing). real inlaid purfing adds to the strength of the violin and helps to avoid cracks.

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1stimestar
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September 9, 2014 - 4:39 am
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Oh gosh, so sorry to hear about your violin.  I would be heartbroken!  I bought mine when I knew nothing about them but did at least have a music store run by friends so I told them what my price range was and they made me a deal.  Good luck. 

 

Opportunity is often missed because it wears suspenders and looks like hard work.

 

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