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A string's thickness
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argy1678
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May 16, 2012 - 12:32 pm
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I was wondering, is there any problem at all if i change my strings and put on less thick ones? I mean, are thick strings something i have to get used to because they have more full sound or something, while thin ones have poorer sound? By the way i use dominant strings and have some trouble doing vibrato for they are quite thick compared to my old violin's strings ( which i also don't know what firm they were ). By tomorrow i will have uploaded ( good quality ) pictures of my new violin so that you may see what my strings are like.

Thank you devil-violin

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Oliver
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May 16, 2012 - 12:36 pm
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Strings are not just "good" or "bad".  It's a matter of your style and the sound (quality) you want to achieve.

There are choices of "light", "medium" and "heavy". 

Most people are happy with medium.

I never liked the sound of light.  Tinny (?)

violin-student

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cdennyb
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May 16, 2012 - 12:44 pm
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there's no problem at all... many times someone will change strings several times before they find the perfect combination of sound and tone they like or for a particular fashion or style of music they choose to play. Most players will play a "set" of strings and others will mix and match their selection to get a particular sound from their instrument. Some instruments don't respond well to a particular string in a particular position so changing it will often times enhance that series of notes played to match the other strings abilities to produce equal quality sound.

Thin strings tend to be from the 'steel core' variety and the thicker ones are often the 'synthetic core' versions, not always but majority of the time. If you were to install a set of 'gut' strings, they are available in a multitude of diameters or sizes and depending on the type of music you'd be playing, they'd sound totally different as well and the cost is significantly higher and their useful life span is considerably shorter in general. Todays technology has a very high quality synthetic core string that is very economical in price and has a long life span.

 

At FM's fiddlershop.com site, he has a lot of different strings at very attractive prices so you would be able to economically change strings to find a set to suit your playing preferences.

If your violin sounds harsh and has a tin or metallic sound, changing to the syn core strings will soften it and if you have a 'quiet' instrument then using a heli-core will brighten it up. It's a lot of test and tune time but the result will be what you want the sound to be. good luck. Look forward to seeing the pics.crossedfingers

"If you practice with your hands you must practice all day. Practice with your mind and you can accomplish the same amount in minutes." Nathan Milstein

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 17, 2012 - 8:47 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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You don't need to play on thicker strings. You can order light tension strings which are thinner. They react quicker but do not generally project as much.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Joe
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May 20, 2012 - 1:15 am
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id like to find some thicker strings

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Fiddlerman
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May 20, 2012 - 12:46 pm
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High tension strings are thicker but they may be too tense for your violin. Produce more sound but don't react as quickly.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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cdennyb
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May 20, 2012 - 5:16 pm
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Also, a thought... regarding high tension strings.

 

If your instrument is the least bit fragile or 'old' and possibly of questionable stability then the high tension strings will only aggravate the possible demise of your violin. High tension strings put a lot of stress on all the glue joints of the body. I'm not saying they don't work, may times they do and do it perfectly. But keep in mind the average and normal force exerted down on the body thru the bridge is in the neighborhood of 40-50 lbs of force and it's trasmitted thru the bridge to the body, and then partly thru the soundpost to the back. Add high tension strings and the number jumps up about 10lbs.

Not all violins have the bridge close to the post and this may possibly warp the top earlier vs a low or medium tension string set. Some violins just sound better with the post more under the treble foot of the violin bridge, some don't like it so close and this is where the force creates a bending moment right next to the post location and thus may contibute to the splitting or causing of a "soundpost crack" you may gave heard of, and there's probably more cracks produced from high tension strings than low or medium tension strings. I have no link to any hard data to prove that but the logic points me in that direction.

I'm no expert but I do a little basic work on viloins at a shop and I see this on occassion. It isn't seen on a lot but I've been told this by a man of 25 yrs service to the business of keeping violins alive and well.

"If you practice with your hands you must practice all day. Practice with your mind and you can accomplish the same amount in minutes." Nathan Milstein

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Oliver
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May 20, 2012 - 9:17 pm
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I would add that sound post cracks are also associated with sound posts being too tight.

One of my early sound post jobs actually elevated the entire right side of the violin in the vicinity of the "f" hole.

I have never seen a convincing method for making and fitting the perfect sound post, but I can imagine it is more art than science and that's OK with me.

coffee2

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Fiddlestix
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May 21, 2012 - 6:56 am
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Oliver said
I would add that sound post cracks are also associated with sound posts being too tight.

One of my early sound post jobs actually elevated the entire right side of the violin in the vicinity of the "f" hole.

I have never seen a convincing method for making and fitting the perfect sound post, but I can imagine it is more art than science and that's OK with me.

coffee2

Same problem with my 130 yr. old Da Salo... it raised the top near the F hole. I asked my luthier if it could be corrected with a shorter sound post. His reply was, it's been that way much to long, by putting in a shorter post, you take the chance of applying too much pressure on the top and cracking it.

So..... it is, what it is now.    facepalm

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Fiddlerman
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May 21, 2012 - 9:20 am
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As long as it sounds good right? I actually think it is pretty cool when you see an old violin with the right side f-hole lifted much higher because of the sound post and age. It kind of reflects the fact that wood is a moving material. More a sign of nature so to speak.

violin-student

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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