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A week without practice
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Dan-Hur
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August 9, 2017 - 1:36 pm
Member Since: May 16, 2014
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So my job and a few other restrictions left me unable to pick up my violin for over a week. Coming back, I can really feel how rusty I became after what seemed like a pretty negligible time away from it. Now, I'm trying to figure out a way to practice more efficiently with the time I have, but it's pretty difficult. It seems easy to spend most of the (roughly) 30 minutes I try to set aside on scales and other exercises that I feel like I'm cheating the time I spend on more interesting pieces. I've always wondered what the practice sessions are like for musicians that go for 4+ hours are structured. Obviously, I don't have that kind time, but I'm curious if I could apply a similar process to the time I do have. 

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Hermes
Athens, Greece
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August 11, 2017 - 12:49 pm
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Since you are on a tight schedule it may be a good idea to think of what you are about to play beforehand...Maybe divide the time you have in some parts, for example one part schales arpeggios and warm up, one part an etude, one part revision of the piece you are working on and in the end a part in which you try to go further...

You can set general goals for example to achieve something particular in a certain deadline, but if your practice sessions are limited due to other things you have to do, maybe you can set either smaller goals in each session, or larger ones in multiple sessions...

Most of us pick the instrument, do a warm up and just play (I am guilty of that many times). It could be fun when you've got plenty of time, but then you can get tired without doing anything particular...but setting small goals each and every time, and dividing the time of study into smaller sections with a particular task could be more effective...When I don't do this, I eventually get lost, and achieve things randomly (if any) 

So yes, I think you can give your practice sessions the same structure, at least you can give it a go 🙂

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RockingLR33
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August 12, 2017 - 11:48 pm
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That's roughly what my work schedule has me on. Rarely do I get to practice over 30 minuets at a time. I see what I'm having problems I'm having in a piece or just in playing in general and I work on that for about 5 to 10 minuets.  then I practice scales for a few minuets and the last few minuets I try to spend playing what ever I want, whether it be something that popped into my head or a piece I've 'mastered' and play for fun.

 

Short and sweet is the easiest  for me to learn. If I'm having major difficulties with something I practice on it and then leave in alone for a few days and then try it again. It's amazing how, for me at least, the issues seem to go away once I've practiced a bit and then let it mellow in my brain. good luck.

Lead me, Follow me, or get out of my way!

             ~General George S. Patton

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
August 14, 2017 - 6:29 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 12783

@RockingLR33 - sounds like you found a system that works for you. That is great. Short sessions work well with many players and keeps some from tensing up and using too much excess energy when playing. It also allows for practice even when others might say they don't have time.

For others, who are able to both relax and concentrate for longer periods, the short periods don't allow enough warm-up and structured practice to accomplish their goals.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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RockingLR33
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August 15, 2017 - 9:03 pm
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Pierre I definally have found a system that works for me as of right now 😀 I'm slowly building up to longer practices but it for now it keeps not only my muscles but my mind focused on the task. When I start getting tired for frustrated I take a break.

Lead me, Follow me, or get out of my way!

             ~General George S. Patton

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
August 17, 2017 - 9:02 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 12783

Not a bad idea to take a break when you are Frustrated.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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