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Do You like playing for people?
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filippa olsson
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May 9, 2011 - 6:16 pm
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Hiii! I love the violin and i wanna learn how to play it! Smile

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 9, 2011 - 7:45 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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Great filippa,

Hope that I can be of help 🙂

Maybe you will even be the one to win the fiddle on June 11th.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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lenasv.
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May 10, 2011 - 3:04 am
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I love playing for a recorder 🙂

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 10, 2011 - 9:40 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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Then you might be one of the few. Another question is, do you like to listen to what you record? Many people hate to hear themselves. Just like lot's of people hate to hear their own voices recorded.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Oliver
NC
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May 11, 2011 - 9:28 pm
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I think that every student should be recorded and required to listen at least every few months Yell 

There is nothing else that serves as such a ruthless but fair critic.

It is better that a performer hears it before an audience does Surprised

 

Cry    Cry    Cry    Cry    Cry  

 

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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lenasv.
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May 12, 2011 - 2:59 am
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Oh, Fiddlerman! Honestly, I totally hate listening to it! 🙂 Its always squeaky and disappointing, especially concert recordings. I noticed however, that it can be much more endurable by placing a recorder close to the violin, ca 1.5 m away, directed between violin and piano. Worst, is it to listen to concert recordings. At least I, during stress get a much higher error rate than usually (intonation and precision), so then one is sort of ashamed for what one produced on stage.

On the other hand, when one records, one can polish pieces in the same way as a painter does when he works on his painting. One hears "oh that sounds crappy", and one modifies it until it sounds nice. And then repolishing with a piano. I find the polishing with recording being a very creative process where one hears if one improved the piece or not ...:)

The problem is still, what sounds good on a recording 1.5 meter away, does not sound good on a recording 5 meters away, where the public should sit. Therefore concert recordings are almost meant to sound horrible 🙂 The other problem, is that I have noticed that it looks like public prefers the same way as me when its 1.5 meters away. Its difficult to know, how it actually did sound.

I totally agree with Oliver. However, I know some people…despite what they produce when playing…simply love hearing themselves. I think, this is what determines whether you progress or not 🙂

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 12, 2011 - 7:07 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11694

I'm not sure about the 1,5 vs 5 meters away phenomena but I'll have to experiment someday. Maybe you can explain in what way the sound is different.

However, I agree 100% about the benefit of recording your own playing and analyzing for improvement. Many people think that everyone plays out of tune except for themselves until they hear themselves on a recording for the first time. Laugh

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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lenasv.
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May 12, 2011 - 7:48 am
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I think its primarily that if one plays with a piano, the size difference between the instrument boxes is less noticed at shorter distances 🙂 At 1.5 meters away, actually the color of your tone is preserved in the recording.

Its difficult to play clean!!!

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 12, 2011 - 9:08 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11694

I see what you mean. Are you referring to balance too? I think I recall you saying something about finding an instrument that was not too loud or harsh sounding. Playing chamber music and in large rooms is where you find that a powerful instrument is necessary to avoid the need to work and press too hard. By the same token, the instrument should have the capacity to play beautifully at soft and low levels.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Cheerfulmother
Hampton, Georgia
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May 13, 2011 - 10:32 pm
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I started playing the violin when I was in the 3rd grade, I played all the way to my 11th grade year.  I just recently started playing agian,(3 years ago) after my best friend got me another violin for my birthday.  I have found that it is a lot like riding a bike, a little shacky and scary at first, but I am finally starting to get the hang if it again.  The hard part for me is that I am now playing for my church with the worship team and they only use chord charts. I have learned how to read chord charts and apply them to the violin.  I would love to learn to play by ear so I want need the music at all. I really enjoy playing agian, I am just a little scared b/c I am so use to playing with an orchestra, not with a band, so I am the only violinist. 

 

On another note, I am hoping to win the violin you are giving away for my daughter.  Olivia just turned 9 yrs old and she has been asking me about playing the violin. She informed me a few weeks ago that once she learned to play the violin and got good at it that she wanted to then learn how th play the cello.  She really knows how to make her mommy proud!Wink

Mellissa Clark

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 14, 2011 - 1:08 am
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Sounds great,

Happy to hear that it's like riding a bike. Good luck with the drawing in June 🙂

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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kleinerfinger
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June 12, 2013 - 1:39 am
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I enjoy playing on stage at a worship church. I know I am not professional but the instrument somehow finds away of fitting in to music  that originally does not have violin playing. It can be a work of art of imagining a melody or riffs that you put into music. My wish also is to be able to carry the sound out of an acoustic instrument to be heard with amped instruments.  When I am heard the people raise there arms.LOL

When you get the basics. The violin is a good tool for playing by ear when playin with other instruments. You can be amazed how it fits in.

 

I want to learn more about chords: Rythim (strum) eg. Reggae; african; espaniel;Country double stops.

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kleinerfinger
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June 12, 2013 - 1:52 am
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Cheerfulmother said
I started playing the violin when I was in the 3rd grade, I played all the way to my 11th grade year.  I just recently started playing agian,(3 years ago) after my best friend got me another violin for my birthday.  I have found that it is a lot like riding a bike, a little shacky and scary at first, but I am finally starting to get the hang if it again.  The hard part for me is that I am now playing for my church with the worship team and they only use chord charts. I have learned how to read chord charts and apply them to the violin.  I would love to learn to play by ear so I want need the music at all. I really enjoy playing agian, I am just a little scared b/c I am so use to playing with an orchestra, not with a band, so I am the only violinist. 

 

On another note, I am hoping to win the violin you are giving away for my daughter.  Olivia just turned 9 yrs old and she has been asking me about playing the violin. She informed me a few weeks ago that once she learned to play the violin and got good at it that she wanted to then learn how th play the cello.  She really knows how to make her mommy proud!Wink

I know what you are saying when you get chords. then you take the chords and prospectively you think of a harmony sometimes scaling up and down. or higher octave.

 

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Fiddlerman
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June 15, 2013 - 7:13 am
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Hard to be heard over loud amplified instruments kleinerfinger. It all depends on if they are great musicians and back off when you are playing a solo. There are great condenser mics for acoustical violins though.
How is it going with your chord and rhythm work?

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Crazymotive
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June 27, 2013 - 6:10 pm
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Yes, I do like playing for people. About a year ago around this time I joined an amateur symphony orchestra. For the first few months it was disastrous. I could not keep pace with the orchestra nor follow along with the sheet music in front of us.  It seemed daunting, I was becoming sure that I will never make it and I even contemplated quitting the orchestra altogether. Then, around the holiday season a strange thing happened. I found I could suddenly follow along with the orchestra and understand where they were with respect to the music in front of us.  When I returned after the holiday break I discovered that I was not just able to follow along but I was playing along in synch with the rest of the orchestra, at least most of the time.  Some passages of music are difficult and I could end up getting lost for a moment of two but I could also manage to pick up and continue on. In addition my skills started rapidly improving, I was finding it easier and easier to chance positions, i.e. first, 2nd, third, 4th position, I was understanding how classical symphony music was written, I was learning to watch not only the music but the conductor as well and follow his directions.  Recently I played two concerts with the orchestra in front of a faitly decent sized audience. More exciting to me is that nowadays I am actually playing music that I never imagined myself ever being able to play.Symphonic compositions written by Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Dvorak, Elgar, Handel, Mahler, Shostakovich, Ravel, and lots more. And I am playing the music as written by the composers, as opposed to simplified arrangements.  We are currently working on Beethoven's 5th and we are planning to perform the entire symphony from start to finish.

I am not writing this to complement or pat myself on the back but more along the lines of encouraging people to stick with it and to not give up and to keep trying, even if things seem extremely difficult or impossible at first. If you keep at it and stick with  it you'll be amazed at what you can accomplish and as you accomplish more and more you'll gain self confidence and you won;t mind (or will even enjoy) playing for (or with) others, even if you don't feel comfortable with it at the beginning.

Lastly, if you can I highly recommend joining, or starting a local community amateur orchestra. It will keep you motivated and help improve your skills. Or, if not a whole orchestra a small group, even a small, informal group of local musicians or even beginning players. Working and playing along with others can be a big help in improving your abilities and skills and who knows, before long you may find yourself playing music that you never imagined possible.

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Ginnysg
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June 27, 2013 - 9:07 pm
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So far the only people I've played for are my grandchildren (6 & 7 years old)  and they are an EASY audience.  I did a quick scale, just to get my bearings... and they applauded wildly! 

“Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent” 

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DanielB
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June 28, 2013 - 5:36 am
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I like playing for folks.  I do have a bit of "stage fright", which can make it a bit more difficult for the first few minutes, but once I get going, I'm fine.

I see music as a form of communication.  I like to think that music is something we invented so we could convey things like emotions, mood and mindset that were just too complex to be able to express with words or diagrams.  Poetry is one way spoken language can do a bit better at that, and so we combined it with music to be able to sing songs, maybe with some accompaniment.  Probably one of the best things the human race ever came up with.  LOL

It was something so important to us that we invented ways to write it down.  Before that, songs were passed down by being remembered by one generation and learned by the next.  If the person that knew it died before it got passed down, it sometimes just got lost.  But some of it got passed down or someone thought to write it down, and so most of us do some songs that started centuries before we were ever born.

I do recall from a thread somewhere over the months here that some folks don't like playing for family.  Well, that's a choice, I guess.  But just a thought to think on maybe with that.  My grandmother on my mother's side died when I was around 4 or 5 yrs old.  I don't remember her face clearly.  Even though she used to talk with me quite a bit, I don't think I could recount much of what she ever said.  But I remember her playing harmonica.  Not just the songs she used to play, but the distinctive sound and style of her playing.  When she was going to play for a bit, she'd always begin and end with a couple verses of the old song "Home!  Sweet Home!" (the one with the line "Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home").

My grandmother on my father's side, I never got to know much.  She died when I was still a toddler, and before I could talk.  Don't remember what she looked like.  But I remember the sound of her voice when she sang to me and rocked me when I was sick.  I haven't ever found the song, but I remember the melody and a few words of the chorus.  

Powerful stuff, music.  But if you don't play/sing for people in your family, those sort of things can't happen.

I'll get off the soapbox on that topic now.  LOL

More recently, a few weeks ago, a family member we don't get to see often was by for a visit.  He's a musician, he took piano in his younger years.  Classical, did the recitals and such, but ended up going into a different career and so now he plays for his own enjoyment or when friends are over sometimes.  An amateur, in the very best sense of the word.  But all the musical instruments around here, of course we got to talking and I had to show off my pretty toys and play for a bit on each for him.  It was great fun, and a couple of hours passed in the blink of an eye.  A friend of the family also dropped by and stayed for coffee and to listen for a while.  It was a good time.

Didn't get anything like a jam session going, since he doesn't play by ear and didn't have any score with him.  I'll want to think of something for that maybe, next time he visits.

Anyway, I've heard a lot of folks on this forum say that they only want to be able to play for their own enjoyment.  Well, I think a musician should always enjoy when they play and sometimes we do indeed play for just ourselves.  But I also think that if that if you don't play for other people (we can include the non-human "people" like cats, dogs, rats, chickens or whatever), then you are missing out on some of what music can be for you and others. 

Like I said, I see it as a form of communication.  We play to say something or show something to others that maybe words alone would just be "too little" to manage.

 

"This young wine may have a lot of tannins now, but in 5 or 10 years it is going to be spectacular, despite the fact that right now it tastes like crude oil. You know this is how it is supposed to taste at this stage of development." ~ Itzhak Perlman

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Picklefish
Merritt Island, Fla
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June 28, 2013 - 10:03 am
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I didnt used to because I felt like I couldnt play anything perfectly. Now that I am not a perfectionist and I am much more relaxed and dont mind playing for anyone now. I still would like to play as perfectly as possible and am constantly trying for that goal, It doesnt get in my way anymore. I feel like this site has helped tremendously.

"Please play some wrong notes, so that we know that you are human" - said to Jascha Heifetz.

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DanielB
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June 28, 2013 - 10:33 am
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Personally, I think the "perfection" attitude can become bad for anything if you let it turn into an obstacle.

Does someone need to be able to cook a burger or chicken perfectly to cook at a backyard cookout?  Does a batch of cookies have to be perfect before one would give any to family and friends?

People that do crafts, like crochet or knitting frequently give away even fairly early projects to others.  Those usually aren't perfect either.  That will not mean that they may not be appreciated, though.

Sure, one wants things like that to be good.  Or at least "not crappy".  But perfect?  I don't think music is ever actually perfect, not in this world, anyway. 

 

"This young wine may have a lot of tannins now, but in 5 or 10 years it is going to be spectacular, despite the fact that right now it tastes like crude oil. You know this is how it is supposed to taste at this stage of development." ~ Itzhak Perlman

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Mattwatt
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June 28, 2013 - 6:11 pm
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At first I just tried to play well enough that the dogs didn't leave the room.

Then I progressed to the point that I didn't want to put the fiddle down because it hurt my ears.

Now I'm to the point where I don't mind playing for the wife.

So this being said, I think it's imperative to play for others. Even if it is for yourself at first. 

lenasv. said
...

On the other hand, when one records, one can polish pieces in the same way as a painter does when he works on his painting. One hears "oh that sounds crappy", and one modifies it until it sounds nice. And then repolishing with a piano. I find the polishing with recording being a very creative process where one hears if one improved the piece or not ...:)

I like that statement.

I've just recently came to realize the true art of music (might be obvious to everyone else, but I didn't get it until recently) is to convey your own feelings to the listener and cause them to think/feel the same as you in that moment. This thought means a lot more in a live performance than a recording does. You can see a true musician giving their heart and soul and have the audience completely mesmerized and entranced. It's a very magical moment for all involved. I think it's something at the very core of humanity and our survival probably depended on this cultural bonding experience.

The ability to have a strong connection between the performer and the audience is just plain huge in my eyes and the reason I have a passion for playing. Whether it's a grandmother to her lineage or a rock star playing for the masses, that connection is more important than your intonation or whether you hit the right note (although it sure helps!!) ...and Grandmothers playing for their grandkids are synonymous to Rock Stars in my eyes.

Music connects people. It connects the performer to the audience and the audience among themselves. How many times have you asked someone that you're interested in, "What kind of music do you like?" And from there it creates a bond. It connects us across hundreds of years in an aural/oral tradition. I can "feel" what Bach was feeling when he put those notes together, or at least the feeling he was wanting to convey. It's more amazing to me than what mere words can accomplish.

While I'm no where near able to "move" people yet, my dear friends, I will eventually. This is my goal.

If there's no audience to connect with, why would you play? I'm curious to hear an answer to that.

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