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What's happening to your string as you bow
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Dan-Hur
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September 5, 2015 - 2:48 pm
Member Since: May 16, 2014
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Kind of a neat video that shows the motion of the string as you bow across it. Some pretty interesting stuff is taking place. I don't know if this has been put on here before, but I thought it was really cool. Whenever I watch the strings vibrate, I always thought it was just a straight back and forth kind of motion, but it's more like an elliptical kind of thing. Some people in the comments remarked that they thought the strings were loosened, buy I don't think so. When I look at mine, especially the G, it has a pretty wide range of motion, it's just moving faster than my eye can see to make out all the detail. What do you guys think? 

And  little background material on waveforms and the physics of stringed instruments. Pretty cool stuff.

https://plus.maths.org/content/why-violin-so-hard-play

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Fiddlerman
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September 5, 2015 - 3:04 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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Very cool. LOL

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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BillyG
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September 6, 2015 - 6:43 am
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THAT is awesome.   

I had always been convinced that when I moved to a set of lower tension strings I was "having trouble" playing them - it was as if while playing on the G, the string would "rattle" against a finger nail, stopped in position, on the next higher string up.  I "tidied up" my fingering to make it a bit more "precise" and the "problem" went away.  I think the depth of movement convinces me that was exactly what was happening....

And no, I don't think the string was loosened.

It's also interesting to see the oscillatory mode change from the sort of "travelling wave" when the bow is in contact, to the "simple" sinusoidal condition of the string once the bow is lifted.   I'm kind of busy right now, but I'll check out that link you gave later.  Thanks for the interesting post !

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes.  

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

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Crazymotive
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September 10, 2015 - 4:00 am
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Beautiful. Sort of reminds me of watching a power line in a hurricane. This video reminds us that Music, Mathematics, and Physics are very tightly connected. Reminds me of an art teacher I had in college who would always stress how art and the sciences are interdependent.

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BillyG
Far North-west Scotland
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September 10, 2015 - 12:21 pm
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Crazymotive said
Beautiful. Sort of reminds me of watching a power line in a hurricane. This video reminds us that Music, Mathematics, and Physics are very tightly connected. Reminds me of an art teacher I had in college who would always stress how art and the sciences are interdependent.

Exactly  !   And the sheer beauty of it is that I would bet that many of all the great players would say that they know nothing about math and physics - but - in spite of that, their innate "art and technique" has won-out over the knowledge of frequencies, just-or-equal-temperament, etc etc etc....  the list goes ON and ON...

I'm  a scientist and engineer at heart - but - my music (being but a hobby - OK - it's an obsession in early retirement) - is "decoupled" from that, although at times I like to bring the math / analyses etc into it to "widen" my understanding of the "physical basis" of music, and "why" we hear things the way we do - be they a sequence of tones in a melody, or more complex sounds like chord transitions etc...

Music?  It's just wonderful.....

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes.  

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

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