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Analyze This
Please say what you can about the properties of this piece.
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
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RosinedUp
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February 25, 2013 - 3:57 am
Member Since: September 7, 2012
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Here I play the melody of a fairly obscure song by a pop artist who was somewhat famous in the 1970's and is still active today.

Please test your ability to understand its properties.

Rather than spilling the beans to all, please send a private message explaining all you can about the piece as I have played it.

Of particular interest is the scale.

I would be interested in speculations and impressions about the genre.  The original moves perhaps twice as fast as my slow rendition.

I will be surprised but pleased if anyone can give the name of the piece.

Critiques on my playing are welcome too, but please remember I recorded this only an hour or two after playing it the first time!

Answers and discussion some time after 8 AM EST Tuesday.

 

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
February 25, 2013 - 8:16 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11702

I couldn't figure it out but I did discover that this search engine is not very good.

http://www.peachnote.com/

Enter the below numbers and touch the screen somewhere, hit space or something and you'll see the sheet then choose a search and nothing will even resemble it. LOL

I guess that is what I get for trying to cheat.

57 0 -2 0 -2(4) -1(4) -2 0 0 2 0 0(4) -2(4) -2 2(16) 0(16)

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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RosinedUp
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February 25, 2013 - 9:51 am
Member Since: September 7, 2012
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Fiddlerman said
  ... I did discover that this search engine is not very good.

LOL, I was clever enough to choose something fairly obscure.  But not so obscure that there is no version on youtube.  So it will be more satisfying at the end!

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RosinedUp
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February 26, 2013 - 9:44 am
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Thank you to all participants.

AndieKae gave the only correct answer.  Her reasoning and mine are as follows.

The piece contains all and only the pitches of the C key signature, that is, exactly the seven natural pitches: C D E F G A B.  So the key signature is C.

The tonic (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T.....28music%29)  of the piece is D.  This is because each phrase and the piece itself end on D.  For this piece, there is a sense of resolution or stability when reaching D.

It follows that the scale is D-Dorian.  Here is why:

First think of ascending the major scale of the key signature, in this case think of ascending the C-Major scale, since the key signature is C.

Each note in a scale represents a scale degree (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.....ale_degree).  The mode is determined by counting the scale degrees in ascending the major scale from the name of the key signature to the name of the tonic. 

If the key signature and the tonic were the same, the piece would be in major mode.  Since they are different, the piece must be in some other mode.

In general, the difference in scale degrees in going from the key signature to the tonic determines the mode as follows:

0: Ionian (Major)

1: Dorian

2: Phrygian

3: Lydian

4: Mixolydian

5: Aeolian (minor)

6: Locrian

In this example, there is a jump of 1 scale degree in going up the major scale from the name of the key signature C to the tonic D.  Therefore the mode is Dorian.  Both the name of the tonic and the name of the mode are used in the scale's name.  So the name of the scale is D-Dorian.

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Mt. Fiddler
Adirondacks, NY
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February 26, 2013 - 9:04 pm
Member Since: December 31, 2012
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I get it.  THANKS!

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RosinedUp
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February 27, 2013 - 5:45 am
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This comes from Dancing in the Meadow, on the 1976 album Wild Swans Against the Sun, by Michael Martin Murphey

I didn't find the original.  Here is a cover:

It is basically a banjo piece, but there might be ways to adapt it to a bluegrass band.

I feel that the lyrics are outstanding and may give life to this piece a hundred years from now.

http://www.metrolyrics.com/dan.....rphey.html

The original is more energetic than this cover.  It features John McEuen of the the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, on fiddle and banjo.   MMM plays clawhammer banjo and guitar and does the lead vocal.  There is also mando, piano, lap slide steel, drums, and synthesizer.

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