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'Ricci on Glissando' Book
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Composer
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July 16, 2011 - 1:23 am
Member Since: July 12, 2011
Forum Posts: 177
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Despite the impractical parts (extreme stretches of the hand and how to hold the violin),  and his take on Paganini which I find unconvincing,  his philosophy on learning the violin is up my alley.  The DVD on bowing is a bit comical as Ruggeiro is in advanced age but I'm going to utilize his approach to improving intonation.  I don't think this book gets much attention so maybe its not so good?

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
July 16, 2011 - 8:30 am
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11694

I didn't even know about the book. Where did you find the information for it?
Do you have this book? I'm curious because he was a buddy of my first main teacher, Thomas Tzaggaris.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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July 25, 2011 - 3:30 pm
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http://www.ruggieroricci.com/r.....rdings.htm

What is interesting is that he believes single note scale practice is a waste of time because it doesn't fully develop an aural faculty necessary for complicated combinations of double stops, chords, and harmonic progressions. It is thus uninteresting finger exercises.

If you start with a chordal approach right from the beginning, the entire process of learning left hand technique is greatly speeded up and you achieve pure intonation rather than approximate intonation. This approach avoids short shifting with the thumb and fingers moving concurrently. Long practise sessions to achieve shifting mastery are eliminated.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
July 25, 2011 - 8:13 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 11694

Would love to see it but am not going to order it for now.
I do agree that chords are important to practice but not that scales are a waste of time. We can hear intonation problems based on short term tone memory. Also we perfect finger patterns. Carl Flesch has scales and arpeggios with 3rds, 5ths and octaves.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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