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Chords and how we can learn from the tenor guitar
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Andrew Shumway
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December 2, 2018 - 10:41 am
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The tenor guitar should really be tuned CGDA. I say that because it can be, and often is, tuned DGBE, with different strings of course.

But chords on any instrument tuned in fifths all have the same limited shape (excepting physical limitations to stretching and so on). Same goes for arpeggios.

This video gives a very useful description of how triad chords work in fifths tuning. It is directly applicable to violin, viola, mandolin, tenor banjo.

If @Fiddlerman wants, he can move this post somewhere else - maybe to a category like the mandolin category? Really I wanted it to be about violin chords and arpeggios, although it could fit well in a mandolin thread.

There are only three major chord triad shapes (humanly) possible on three strings (the subject comes under the heading "group theory" if you know maths), but I lack the notational tools to list them here. Maybe @Fiddlerman could do a video on them? You'll find that each of the three shapes on the top three strings will combine with one other on the lower three strings to make three four-string shapes. The minors simply involve finding the third and flattening it, and then you can work out how to do a dom 7 yourselves.

Interesting - the spellchecker likes maths but not math!

Using standard guitar notation, the three shapes would be

x023 (major) A

x013 (minor)

x122 (major) B

x022 (minor)

x002 (major) C

x001 (minor)

The 4-string combinations are A+B (0233), B+C (1224/1220) and C+A (0023).

I hope that's not too confusing. If you don't play guitar, it will be.

For your delectation, here's John Lawlor. I think a year or two ago I checked his tuning, and it's what you might call "slack" - a tone below the norm - Bb,F,C,G

I always wanted to be a juvenile delinquent but my parents wouldn't let me.

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Mark
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December 3, 2018 - 4:09 am
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Here are a couple of examples of chord charts for the Fiddle you might find interesting.

 

Mark

Master the Frog and you have mastered the bow.

Albert Sammons

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Andrew Shumway
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December 3, 2018 - 4:40 am
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Thanks, Mark!

I always wanted to be a juvenile delinquent but my parents wouldn't let me.

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BillyG
Brora, North-east Scotland
December 3, 2018 - 6:16 am
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That's cool @Mark - it probably comes intuitively to folks knowledgeable with music theory - but I had never quite "internalized" the relationships as an actual visual image.   Sweet !   That'll stick in my head !  hats_off

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes. D'oh - guntohead.JPG

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

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Andrew Shumway
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December 3, 2018 - 6:20 am
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Ah, violin tabs! (clearly 1L means 1 Low)

I always wanted to be a juvenile delinquent but my parents wouldn't let me.

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Mark
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December 5, 2018 - 6:59 am
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more examples of chords for reference.

Mark

Master the Frog and you have mastered the bow.

Albert Sammons

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Mark
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December 5, 2018 - 7:05 am
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Found this interesting is for mandolin how ever it would apply to the fiddle.

Mark

 

Master the Frog and you have mastered the bow.

Albert Sammons

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Andrew Shumway
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December 5, 2018 - 7:22 am
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What I wanted to stress was the very small number of chord shapes.

But explanations (using clumsy notation) and diagrams of interwoven triangles add a level of complexity that obscures the simplicity of the reality. You have to try to see through it all to the underlying structures.

I always wanted to be a juvenile delinquent but my parents wouldn't let me.

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