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Another new member from England.
Raw novice.
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (41 votes) 
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Gordon Shumway
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October 3, 2021 - 7:28 am
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It could be, but I hope n is less than 25!

Colin, forget you heard the word "étude" (study - piece of music aimed at developing technique). Violinists are obsessed by them. In 8 years of piano playing I only ever played 3 etudes. More than 100,000 have been written for the violin, and you'll read people on other forums prescribing them as though they've played all of them!

Like Fiddlerman says, baby steps.

Don't try to play tunes yet. Try to play individual notes that sound nice and are in tune. Four fingers on one string is a good thing to learn.

Get a teacher if you can.

Your first tune should probably be Twinkle Twinkle, but don't get too into Suzuki - we British tend to leave that to America!

If you are making a third violin, you are sure to buy a fourth before long. Don't fall into the trap of acquiring a fleet of violins and not learning to play them. The Hidersine could easily be the only one you'll ever need.

Ooh, I bought page 3!

P.S. Don't be fooled by my "Pro advisor" status - it just means I post a lot, lol!

Andrew

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stringy
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October 3, 2021 - 7:46 am
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great to see you are enjoying it so much, really refreshing, love it when people get into the fiddle playing its a very pleasing and rewarding instrument, like I said earlier itbecomes quite a passion. The aches are just because its such an unnatural position to hold something, and also are caused by neck and back tension which is the bane of violinists, me anyway. Its easier to break your practices up into smaller time chunks through the day, this gives your body time to become accustomed to the unfamiliarity.

Keep playing and enjoying;)

by the way good advice from gordon/Andrew

Bit more, bit more, snap #*÷?×[email protected]?#[email protected]

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Gordon Shumway
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October 3, 2021 - 7:51 am
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stringy said
The aches are just because its such an unnatural position to hold something, and also are caused by neck and back tension which is the bane of violinists  

No, not just! There's no guarantee your posture is not at fault! One of the reasons to get a teacher is to correct your posture. You have to be aware of where both your shoulders and both your elbows are, among other things.

As to the left wrist, yes, it does take a while to get used to the twisting, but do it gently. Like yoga, relax and don't force anything.

Andrew

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October 3, 2021 - 11:48 am
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Hi,

Apologies BillyG I clicked on three stars when I wanted to click on five stars. Thanks for your reply; I'm not in a hurry to get my post count up because it takes me so long to log on I make the most of it whilst logged on and I add everything at once. Is it snowing yet up your way; it's getting colder here at nights.

Thanks Andrew; "étude" forgotten so lots less to think about. I sussed out the quickest way for me to learn (I've been subjected to Kaizen training) was to take it back to basics as in "baby steps" hence I practiced a lot with the E string on all four fingers and this really did feel strange because I put a finger down at the stroke end which I'm now getting a lot better at then I've been practicing on the A string doing the same just going over and over again with long slow bow strokes where I'm starting to feel different bow pressures. Not yet as good on the A string as I am on the E string but catching up; I find the D string to be the hardest because there is little lift of the bow between strings for this; it's all down to practice though and I'm making steady progress; I hope I'm making sense.

I'm happy enough playing and enjoying on my own without getting a teacher; I have looked at local violin teachers and even our local council do violin classes but these classes are based on terms once signed in to a term then locked in until term end; winter is almost upon us and I dislike soakings so prefer to remain home after all  we've now got a lovely studio which is well lit and heated but I appreciate your suggestion.

Thanks stringy; yes I'm enjoying myself finding everything so strange and new but I feel like a child in a candy store with so much to choose from; it's taken over my life and thoughts but it's the only way I learn new hobbies; no half measures just give it all my best; thanks to you members though I'm not struggling on my own so hopefully not creating bad habits. Yes I'm practicing at least twice daily but only for 30 minutes each then my arm doesn't complain; I'm still having problems holding the violin whilst trying to press the strings but I'm still very new to violins.

I'm learning to relax more Andrew and it's helping; as I play I'm now noticing more when I start to tension so let go a bit; I might eventually take on a teacher but as I'm still on the nursery slopes I'm just getting the feel of everything.

Colin_0001.JPGImage EnlargerI'm no oil painting but here I am.Colin_0004.JPGImage EnlargerLooking at the camera trying to do everything at once; this is in the new mirror.Colin_0005.JPGImage Enlarger

Standing straight with the violin resting on my shoulder and against my neck there's a big gap between chin rest and neck this prevents me holding the violin on my shoulder without left hand support.Colin_0006.JPGImage EnlargerColin_0007.JPGImage EnlargerColin_0008.JPGImage EnlargerIn order to support the violin with my chin my head would be over at forty five degrees; I worked down a deep coal mine perhaps a pit prop might help.

Yes I could do well with just the Hidersine which I like but I'd like to both play and make a violin which I'm sure is more than enough for a challenge; as you suggest though I'll keep practicing the strings which I'm finding interesting. I'm sure you are light years ahead of me Andrew.

I'm settling into the new practicing routine each day; if I don't manage practice during the day I still make a point of evening practice; if I don't put myself out I can't expect to learn.

Kind regards, Colin.

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ELCBK
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October 3, 2021 - 8:07 pm
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@Retired -

Nice Violin! 

Possibly need help with your hand/wrist - and, probably the most uncomfortable for me, getting the elbow much further under your violin. 

 

Might want to keep this photo handy. (lol)

https://fiddlerman.com/wp-cont.....d-Left.jpg

 

Allison doesn't use a shoulder rest, talks about that along with more help on hand grip.  So, suggesting this additional video, started here: 

Left Hand Violin Grip! The GRIP OF DEATH

 

https://www.lanesboro.lib.mn.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/cat_fiddle.jpg

 

You are getting there! 🤗 

- Emily

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Hi,

Thanks Emily.

I was trying to balance the violin whilst taking the pictures so possibly not in my usual playing position but you're correct about hand; wrist and elbow positions which I've been working on; Fiddlerman's excellent video showed how to get my elbow under the violin and strangely this morning just before going shopping I had started to watch the video you kindly sent the link to. I'll watch the remainder of the video during dinnertime shortly.

I really do struggle trying to support the violin with my left hand and I know for certain it's making me very tense indeed; I'd like to support the violin with my chin/shoulder releasing my left arm so I need to look into this before wasting lots of time. I've just bought a center chin rest and I'll try anything because one way or another I'm going to play my violins.

I already have two shoulder rests but also now have the mirror where I can see how the shoulder rest is sitting; I know it's totally wrong at the moment so I'll concentrate on holding the violin and get this right before practicing more with the bow.

I did a very stupid thing this morning; I was out of bed at 6 o'clock and had done the three supermarket shopping back home by 8:30. Next I wandered up the rear garden and it was bitterly cold in the strong prevailing breeze; we live on a very steep valley side catching everything the weather throws at us being so exposed; the result I was perished when I came back indoors; the stupid part was I then put the heating on in the studio and immediately picked up the violin; my arm is on fire again due to being so tense and trying to strangle the violin; I'll never do this again.

I know I'm going to make every mistake possible and it doesn't bother me; I'm adding my story as it progresses both good and bad; more good than bad though looking back at how far I've come in a short time; I'll keep experimenting but am now starting to understand the basics; the violin and bow don't feel strange any more and apart from the burning arm I can use the bow on both the E and A strings often without screeching or whistle etc; I know not to apply too much rosin and to keep the strings clean also I make sure the violin is clean after each session and the bow tension is released so thanks again Emily I'm getting there.

I feel once I become comfortable holding the violin without being cruel squeezing its neck then progress should become quicker and easier; like most new skills a lot to learn all at once but I'm volunteering so no complaints from me and I've no intention of letting go.

Update after dinner. I've now watched Alison's excellent tutorial video Emily and as I've got a long neck and sloping shoulders I need a shoulder rest; Alsison doesn't need a shoulder rest but says when she first started playing she did use a shoulder rest and she even recommends the Wolf shoulder rest I already have. I tried using the Wolf but without success so now after gaining a bit more experience I'll try using the Wolf again but now I can see using the mirror allowing me to adjust it correctly. Without using a shoulder rest my head would be over at 45 degrees in order to secure the violin between chin rest and shoulder; I'll also experiment with the center chin rest when it arrives; I've had to grip the violin in order to keep it in place on my shoulder which is the reason I'm having so many problems; possibly I could relocate the violin to the top of my shoulder but I simply don't feel safe knowing if I let go with my left hand the violin will drop; not only do I want to secure the violin but I also want to adopt a good posture saving lots of health problems should I spend a lot of time using the violin.

Kind regards, Colin.

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Gordon Shumway
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October 4, 2021 - 9:22 am
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If your chinrest and shoulderrest combination is right for you (everyone has different neck length and chest size etc), then you should be able to hold the violin comfortably between chin and chest, but try it with your hand ready to catch it if you drop it.

Keeping the wrist straight is not easy. I'm only partially doing it after 3 years.

Andrew

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Hi,

Many thanks Andrew for your suggestion.

WOW at last I've found a very useful video showing how to adjust my Wolf Forte-Secondo shoulder rest; I'm not now surprised I've experienced so many problems holding the violin always needng to grip it with my left hand; this in turn has made reaching strings D & G difficult whilst giving me pain and burning in my left arm. Death grip in fact.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?.....tPp9EF_jys

Laura in the video is very slim build as I am and this coupled with a long neck is the cause of my problem. I've just been playing around with the Wolf and with it adjusted until one screw is fully out the other screw fully in it almost fits and I can just about hold the violin between chin and shoulder rest; at this point it occurred to me there might be user instructions for the Wolf either on the web or even a YouTube video so I had a look and found two YouTube video's showing Laura being set up with the Wolf. I now need to bend the Wolf in order to get it to fit better; I might then even be able to use the standard chin rest but I've also got a center chin rest to be delivered so I can experiment for best fit; the chin rest can be adjusted a bit so I'll try this too. I feel this is a major breakthrough for me and I'm delighted. I tried many positions without a shoulder rest but no way could I get my chin in position to hold the violin; this now explains why. As in the video how many are actually struggling trying to hold their violin without realizing all it takes is adjustment; I'm learning pretty quickly but still have a long way ahead of me before I even master the scales on each string.

I'm still very much a violin novice but I've been specific in searching for the answer to my problem; as you rightly say Andrew we're all different; I'm just tall and skinny so I think even if I do manage to play a violin I'll only manage it with a nicely fitting shoulder rest at least I feel a lot more confident now.

Once I can hold the violin between chin rest and shoulder rest without fear of dropping the violin then I can move onto my next problem of hand; wrist and arm positions which have been badly compromised by not being able to securly hold the violin without left hand support. Whoopee.

Kind regards, Colin.

Wolf-rest_0001.JPGImage Enlarger

My Wolf shoulder rest.

Wolf-rest_0002.JPGImage Enlarger

This curved adjuster refuses to adjust so I need to encourage it a bit harder.

Wolf-rest_0003.JPGImage Enlarger

This is how I currently have it adjusted; the adjusting screws at limit in and out; a bit more adjusting needed.

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Hi,

Last night I spent a while messing around with the shoulder rest getting it near but the chin rest was hurting; I could secure the violin with just chin and shoulder but had to apply quite a bit of pressure on the chin rest to prevent the violin rotating. I adjusted the chin rest to nearer the strings whilst allowing a gap but in the end gave up. I'm aware I'm not alone with this problem and eventually will sort it out. Both my violins appear to have identical chin rests so these must be the standard chin rest.

Being such a novice to violin's I would never have guessed just how complicated it is setting everything up correctly; as with anything new and learning a new skill it takes time and patience; it's frustrating but accepted as part of the learning curve.

I'm just so bony with a long neck which isn't helping; I  bent the shoulder rest a number of ways in the end straightening it out where it now is and I can start over. I'm wondering if I can locate a nearby violin store and just request popping in to be correctly fitted with chin/shoulder rest obviously paying which could save no end of hassle; so near though and I've still got the center chin rest yet to arrive to play around with this being a different shape to the other two chin rests. What fun I'm having. thumbs-up

Kind regards, Colin.

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ELCBK
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October 5, 2021 - 6:48 am
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@Retired -

I'd forgotten about that video - it's great! 

If you can seek out actual physical help to get fitted with a shoulder & chin rest - you'll be miles (kilometers - lol) ahead!   I certainly would have been happier without the hassles I had, trying to figure it out by myself. 

https://rlv.zcache.com/purple_cartoon_music_note_3_ring_binder-r23bc0c71090d41118ef34eb7770106f9_xz8md_8byvr_307.jpg?rvtype=content

 

- Emily

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Gordon Shumway
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October 5, 2021 - 7:09 am
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Retired said
I've still got the center chin rest yet to arrive to play around with this being a different shape to the other two chin rests. 

The two identical ones as supplied with the violins are almost certainly the "Guarneri" pattern. It's by far the most common. It's quit deep, which isn't perfect for my receding chin, but it extends nicely to the left, offering me support when I tilt the violin to play on the G string. Other chinrest designs can be quite technical, and you can also get custom ones. Don't be tempted: it's too soon. There's far more variation in shoulderrests. Stick with the Guarneris, unless you love the centre one, and decide whether you want the shoulderrest slimmer or fatter. The chinrest isn't literally for the chin, either - watch videos of Yehudi Menuhin. He rested his jowl on it when he was older. In fact, in some videos he rests his ear on his chinrest and his jowl on the violin, lol! Your comfort is the main thing.

Don't watch any vibrato videos for a couple of years.

Andrew

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October 5, 2021 - 7:57 am
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Same shoulder rest as mine. Fairly hard to tell but on your last image it looks to me that you are holding the fiddle to far forward.

I had the legs on mine at the same height as yours originally and a luthier on another forum told me they were too high, I was told by him to put the fiddle against my neck while looking straight forward and then turn the head to look down the fingerboard, and see how that feels, don’t know if that’s any use to you, personally if you have a decent luthier nearby I would ask their opinion, I am going to see mine fairly shortly for a new chin rest, I am getting a slightly higher one, I have been advised it’s better having a higher chin rest than shoulder rest. I am no expert on this though and everyone is different, And it’s a personal thing, which is why you would be advised seeing a luthier.

Bit more, bit more, snap #*÷?×[email protected]?#[email protected]

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Hi,

Busy day so catching up at last.

Thanks Emily; Bron and I are watching lots of YouTube videos and it's surprising how many toddlers are being pushed forward to play instruments and we watched one three year old today playing drums; he was truly amazing but as I said earlier these kids should be enjoying their childhood climbing trees and making a nuisance of themselves; they're much too young to be pushed forward like this but then it's only my personal opinion; as a kid I climbed trees and made tree dens etc but then we struggled to buy food and clothes not violins. We didn't even have electricity until I was about five years old.

Thanks Andrew for your useful information; I've so much to learn and am experimenting with what I already have whilst spending bits on different strings and I'm trying different rosin; the center chin rest is only about £14  bought secondhand through eBay but worth trying; Bron and I have watched lots of YouTube videos on setting up a violin; tonight we watched a guy playing without shoulder rest support just lightly supporting the violin neck with the gap between finger and thumb; he admitted playing towards the body was easiest whilst playing away from the body tends to remove the violin from his shoulder but he compensates for this just by thumb movement; it's all very interesting to watch and gives lots of ideas. I've just recovered from vibrato after last year whilst sinking 3' deep fence post holes through solid stone using a very heavy concrete breaker. dazed

Thanks stringy; I was only holding the violin the way I was in order to take the pictures and show my skinny build; we've watched videos where violin players are using nothing more than cut down car washing sponges in fact why so many have to repeat such things on YouTube so many times beats me. I've even considered making my own shoulder rest because I've got lots of sheet aluminium and mechanical engineering skills whilst having the machinery etc; it's getting too cold though to be pottering around in the workshop. 10C at best today with driving rain in a bitterly cold breeze; we're used to this weather in Yorkshire just look at the opening pictures in Wuthering heights from 1.5 mins in; it gets rather grim here;

Lovely place though during our two day long summers.

At the moment I'm unfamiliar with whom we have locally regarding luthiers or violin dealers; I'm trying too hard as usual and need to back off to take stock. One video we watched made sense in that put the violin with chin rest holding it in playing position against the neck then measure the gap to the shoulder this then is the thickness required to use for packing whether sponge or shoulder rest.

I'm breaking away from my two latest projects then I can concentrate on violins; it takes quite a bit of doing when I've been so involved with learning other new skills; I have a friend who owns a business and he uses tungsten carbide tooling but has struggled to get the high qualty tooling he needs but he's managed to obtain a good supply of very high grade carbide tips which I've been brazing onto tooling but I got very involved and made both a brazing machine using a commercial 1,950W micro wave oven transformer which I wound on the secondary to give 975 amps of raw power. definitely not for a novice but things I like to experiment with I've been over to visit him this afternoon to take over a second machine I've made it being a 2,500W induction heater; what am I on about; have a look at this and it's quite different to stringing a violin but interesting and fun to me; this is just the brazing machine I made first;

Brazing_0013.JPGImage Enlarger

Under construction; transformer; circuit boards and relays etc.

Fully-working._0001.JPGImage Enlarger

The completed machine; what fun I do have but this sort of thing is very dangerous indeed; I learn on a need to know basis and having not been taught electrics I'm extremely careful not to glow in the dark; I've got test equipment and am very safety concious I designed this to have only 12VDC on the controls plus it is fully earthed.

I'm now exercising the same level of enthusiasm to violins finding violins both extremely challenging and hugely interesting; as winter starts to bite I can move more into the new studio spending lots of time on violins.

It's been another long day so now time to settle down to some quality time with Bron before bedtime.

Kind regards, Colin.

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Gordon Shumway
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Retired said
spending bits on different strings and I'm trying different rosin;

 

playing towards the body was easiest whilst playing away from the body tends to remove the violin from his shoulder but he compensates for this just by thumb movement

If you've got basic Hidersine strings, you should keep them for 6 months or so and not spend money.

Cheap rosin supplied with violins is often pale yellow Chinese stuff, as hard as lemon quartz and designed for 110F in the shade and 99% humidity. For Yorkshire in the winter, you'll be better off with Hidersine dark. Otoh, if you have a Hidersine violin, maybe you've already got some. Or if you have your CH on high, maybe Hidersine light/amber. Watch a video on how to rosin a bow - there is a technique to protect the bow and the rosin. If you do have pale rosin, you may have to roughen up its surface with a knife first when it's new. Dark rosin is easier to cope with. (the darker it is, the softer it is)

You're talking about shifting, which you won't be doing for a year or more. Basically  the shoulderrest is to give your left hand an easier life.

Andrew

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Hi,

Thank you Andrew for your informative reply.

I bought a pair of E strings just to experment with because I'd been watching or browsing something; they weren't expensive and highly recommended; they are D'Addario Kaplan Violin Golden Spiral Solo. Funds aren't a problem. I also bought D'Addario rosin seen here;

Rosin_0001.JPGImage Enlarger

I removed the gloss using abrasive paper on both types of rosin.

Rosin_0002.JPGImage Enlarger

This is the dark rosin which was highly recommended. I'm open to suggestions because I've got a great deal to learn. At the moment I'm too ignorant to notice any difference between the two. Watching YouTube videos can be highly frustrating; just applying rosin to the the bow hair is so full of contradictions and I've watched a lot of these videos; last night a young lady was applying lots of rosin to her bow hair saying at least ten strokes was needed whereas others state do not use too much rosin it messes everything up and the strings and violin end up coated with it.

Many years ago whilst at hospital with Bron the surgeon was saying to Bron if you ask twelve surgeons for an opinion you'll get twelve different answers; it relates to playing a violin; I take deep interest in each and every reply; there's nothing to stop me trying every suggestion put forward.

Regarding shoulder/chin rests I've just been browsing our local stringed instrument store where they have lots of shoulder rests including the Wolf rest I have on sale new at £28.50 unfortunately they only have one chin rest it being a center rest and I've already got one of these due to arrive so I'll hang on.

Going right back to basics though it's very important to be comfortable playing a violin or any instrument; I'm very uncomfortable and often in pain making learning to play my violins more punishment than pleasure and unless I can improve this it's pointless pushing myself where injury is possible.

We have friends who have started to play instruments but having lost their initial enthusiasm walked away; our friend Joan in Brisbane Australia heads a group who play the uke and guitar also singing they do gigs in their their local area; Joan had to learn violin at school but informs me she eventually gave up it being much too painful; our friend Pauline living in Lecestershire surprised us when we were recently told she too had bought a violin but quickly packed it in; yesterday I was talking to a guy who has three expensive guitars he's had these years but never plays them; our neighbour directly across the street from us also surprised us; he has a sax that he started with but not touched it for years.

We've only recently learned of these and I don't want to or intend to follow them; when things start to go wrong for me I find a solution this is how I've learnt so many skills during my lifetime.

I'm so new to the world of violins but it's now my chosen full time hobby and I'm no quitter; no one pushed me to play a violin and I'm not under any pressure to carry on just because I'm struggling at first; I've endured many learning curves some highly dangerous but I've never yet failed; of course I'm slow getting started but if playing a violin was easy I'd quickly become bored; I'll repeat once again my dream is to play Lara's Theme on a violin I've made myself and I'm now heading towards this dream.

Experienced violin players all started at the bottom just as I'm doing but with practice and lots of it they who stuck with it eventually achieved their ambition; I want to join them but not at a professional level; I want to play a violin just for the fun of being able to; it's an hobby to me not a career choice. I've looked at taking lessons but the classes I've seen appear regimented; I could pay for private tuiton too but silly as it sounds I want to make all the mistakes and even enjoy them; I never learn from what I already know. Sorry if I sound to be preaching but like me there are many other novices joining the forum and I always encourage anyone to try something new but not to give up easily as long as they play safely.

I have the benefit of "Kaizen" training and this training can be applied to absolutely anything; I was subjected to the training because of my job but it can be applied to virtually anything I do including learning to play a violin; it's based on taking any job or task all the way back to absolute basics and start from scratch not just doing something because it's been done a certain way for the last 100 years; it definitely works; as an example a customer places an order for an electric motor this motor requires a brake fitting; standard lead time six weeks; during the training course we took it back to basics and hence halved the lead time.

I possibly sound to be rambling on but I can apply this Kaizen to me learning to play a violin; I'm struggling badly in supporting my violin; after 30 minutes uncomfortable practice my left arm hurts and feels on fire this taking quite a while to ease. I've even removed the finish from my violins neck due to the death grip fear of dropping the violin. How many having reached this stage in learning then decide I'll never play a violin and walk away?

I fully appreciate I'm new kid on the block and have little by way of violin experience to share and I can't particpate at an higher level than raw novice at the moment but at the risk of being boring I have plenty of other skills to fall back upon which I'm now sharing one of them.

If the basics of anything aren't right then why proceed because until the basics are right nothing following will be right either; just my take on where I currently am; I need to let go the death grip and until I do I'll never be happy practicing.

Kind regards, Colin.

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Hello Colin, must say I admire your determination.

violin is quite possibly the hardest instrument in the world to learn, it’s not easy, especially if you have never played anything else but very rewarding when even the smallest thing goes right.

when you play you must have no tension at all, this is very difficult, for me anyway, tension effects everything on violin, including sound, it also effects everything on the player in the form of muscle and arm pain as well as neck pain, people tend press down with their head which causes problems, and at the same time raise their shoulder, which also causes tension and skeletal problems. 

I think there is a luthier shop in York, to get fitted properly that’s who you need to see. You have already found out that there are lots of conflicting opinions on the internet, get the opinion of an expert, worth it in the long run,.

I have been told when usin rosin on a bow for the first time it should be for about five minutes, and afterwards about 3 strokes is enough when the bow loses some grip.

If I were you I wouldn’t rub anymore finish off your fiddle.

you mention friends who tried to learn then stopped, going off my own feelings, or should I say experience, for me music is and always has been a passion, I can’t imagine not being able to either play an instrument of some sort, or not to be able to sing, I play many instruments as most people on here do, I didn’t start with violin I started with guitar forty years ago, but recently violin has taken over from all my other instruments, it’s a challenge to me where the others were not so much. From my perspective I think you have to have a real burning desire to learn which is why so many people have unplayed instruments lying around, once they find out that they won’t be jimi Hendrix in a week they give up.

Don’t think you will do that.

Bit more, bit more, snap #*÷?×[email protected]?#[email protected]

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Fiddlerman
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October 6, 2021 - 9:24 am
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For the heck of it, try playing the violin without really baring down on the instrument. Just let it be there and barely rest your jaw on the chinrest. It might not have to be painful. Also, check out the "Strad Pad".
It's a savior for many players.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Gordon Shumway
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October 6, 2021 - 9:37 am
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That Hidersine rosin is lighter than I knew they made - it looks just like horrible "Chinese summer rosin" - there's a much nicer-looking amber one (3V), or you can try Hill light, which is nice. For dark rosin, you shouldn't ever need anything other than the Kaplan.

stringy said
I have been told when usin rosin on a bow for the first time it should be for about five minutes, and afterwards about 3 strokes is enough when the bow loses some grip.

Bear in mind that some bows come pre-rosined.

Andrew

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Gordon Shumway
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October 6, 2021 - 9:58 am
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Gordon Shumway said

watch videos of Yehudi Menuhin. He rested his jowl on it when he was older. In fact, in some videos he rests his ear on his chinrest and his jowl on the violin, lol! Your comfort is the main thing.

After saying something so outrageous I decided I had to prove it. The video I was thinking of was a folk festival, and I couldn't find it in my Youtube history (maybe I watched it on a forum somewhere), but I found two new things. The second is good fun.

But there are two factors I'm not sure about - I don't think he ever used a shoulderrest, so that may cause him to hold the violin very high up. Also I think he injured one of his arms (or was that Heifetz?) after the war, and that may have affected how he held the violin.

Andrew

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stringy
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October 6, 2021 - 10:11 am
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Gordon Shumway said
That Hidersine rosin is lighter than I knew they made - it looks just like horrible "Chinese summer rosin" - there's a much nicer-looking amber one (3V), or you can try Hill light, which is nice. For dark rosin, you shouldn't ever need anything other than the Kaplan.

stringy said

I have been told when usin rosin on a bow for the first time it should be for about five minutes, and afterwards about 3 strokes is enough when the bow loses some grip.

Bear in mind that some bows come pre-rosined.

  

Quite true, forgot about that.

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