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Memorising pieces
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (1 votes) 
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stringy
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April 18, 2021 - 5:14 pm
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I was just wondering how other people go about memorising longer pieces, I tend to keep playing them over and over till it starts to sink in. has anyone got any tips or ideas? apart from repeating slowly many times.

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GregW
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April 18, 2021 - 5:25 pm
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stringy said
I was just wondering how other people go about memorising longer pieces, I tend to keep playing them over and over till it starts to sink in. has anyone got any tips or ideas? apart from repeating slowly many times.

  

I know youre probably questioning classical music here, but for me it helps to find a version of a tune/song thats close to what im going to learn and listen to it ( yard work/driving/ ) any time i would liaten to music.  helps to get tune in head so you can whistle or hum it.  probably not practical for longer classical pieces but possibly a strategy for those trying out a new fiddle type tune.

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ELCBK
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April 19, 2021 - 2:32 am
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@stringy -

giphy.gif

There might be something here that is helpful. 

https://fiddlerman.com/forum/l.....e-tunes/ 

Think there's a few threads elsewhere about how how our brain (and memory) is supposed to be so much better off because we are learning & playing an instrument. 

Don't think you could prove it by me! 🥴 

Here's a bit of food for thought -

Can't remember if I touched on associating strong emotions with what you don't want to forget - fear, hate, excitement, love.  Associating strong reactions to what you've seen, tasted, smelled or touched - any additional information (more is better) can add another protective layer of help to cement stuff, in long-term memory.

If you can concentrate on, maybe describe out loud, an image of a situation, person or even a ideological belief that stirs up one of your primal emotions, during playing/practice - it could be a great way to reinforce all the information. 

giphy.gif

Wouldn't associate anything horrific that could cause a case of PTSD! 😳 

🤔... now, where did I leave my fiddle? 😱

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stringy
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April 19, 2021 - 10:23 am
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Some good ideas there. Greg you are right I was thinking of classical pieces, I am working on one that is three pages long with no repeated parts in it, so you have to memorise all the pages, and I am struggling a bit with it, but good for a learning experience I suppose.

Emily going to try that link out later as I am in work at the moment but thanks in advance for posting it.

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ELCBK
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April 19, 2021 - 11:42 am
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@stringy -

Many Classical music pieces have stories behind them, I think it can help if you can conjure up some imagery, but bottom line - isn't that the reason we have to learn to read the score? 

Think AndrewH has mentioned elsewhere - try to memorize the difficult passages and where they are located. 

I would memorize in smaller sections, then the order they are in. 

giphy.gif

 

What a GREAT challenge you've given yourself!

- Emily

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Mark
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April 19, 2021 - 11:49 am
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I've read to not rely on muscle memory only to find the notes but to memorize the note pattern A, D, C#, E etc for the while piece.

Mark

Master the Frog and you have mastered the bow.

Albert Sammons

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LilyH
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April 23, 2021 - 3:18 pm
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Personally what helps for me is playing it up to speed but adding in line by line. Make sure you can play the first line correctly and up to speed and by memory before going on to the next. That way you don't just get stuck playing it over and over really slowly and getting bored. Good luck!

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 12, 2021 - 2:18 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
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Mainly, I play the pieces until I don't need to look at the music.
This differs enormously from person to person.
Some people like to memorize certain finger patterns, and some people like to see the notes in their head but in the long run, repetition is your best bet.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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