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s it good to start violin learning from Electric violin?
Is it good to start violin learning from Electric violin?
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (1 votes) 
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adleysmith
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December 18, 2018 - 2:19 am
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Is it good to start learning violin from the Electric violin? I m going to start learning. 

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Mark
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December 18, 2018 - 3:59 am
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Adleysmith, welcome to the forum,

I personally have never played an electric violin but others have said the bowing was more forgiving than an acustic violin is.

Good luck on lessening to play.

 

Mark

Master the Frog and you have mastered the bow.

Albert Sammons

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Irv
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December 18, 2018 - 9:46 am
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There is a lot to recommend a solid body electric violin for practice.  Inexpensive (mine is a Cecilio, which can be inexpensively obtained used via eBay or Amazon Warehouse deals).  Nearly silent (played through headphones).  Can be hung off music stand with bow without fear of low humidity damage.  I used savings to purchase Fiddlerman carbon fiber bow and upgraded pegs to Knilling Perfection.  

Output can be easily put through effect pedals and similar, which is neat if you want to simulate playing on a cello.

Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.  —Werner von Braun

Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.         —Frank Zappa

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pchoppin
Utah
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December 18, 2018 - 12:11 pm
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@adleysmith 

Welcome to the forum!

I have never played an electric violin.  Not because I have anything really against them, but I just do not have access to an electric violin.

I would imagine it is much like the difference between electric and acoustic guitar, in that the two instruments have vastly different sounds and musical styles.  The question is what kind of sound/style of music are you looking for. 

For learning, if you have never played any string instrument before, especially when taking private lessons, I would think it would just be easier to learn on acoustic.  You would not need to bring the speaker system with you to your lesson. Also, I have never met a violin teacher that teaches on electric.  So I would guess that the most common way to learn is first acoustic violin, then play electric.  However, there are always exceptions.  But as a practical consideration, I believe starting with acoustic may make more sense.

- Pete -

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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December 18, 2018 - 1:10 pm
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Welcome Adley, I have never used an electric either. I do like the feel of the vibration of the acoustic, each note has its own distinct signature feel.

@pchoppin , the reason you want to learn on an acoustic guitar is because the strings are harder to press, making it harder to chord, building strength in the fingers. Electric guitar is a lot more forgiving and the strings are closer to the fretboard, and the frets aren't quite as tall normally, the fretboard is more narrow, so it is a lot easier when you make the switch, that's why you seem to be faster on an electric and your intonation seems to get better.

Since the violin isn't fretted and the same pressures are applied to make the notes sing, it seems in the technical aspects it would be nearly the same as far as intonation and bowing. Personally. I have always preferred to start on the harder instrument to learn on, for the reason that you have to try harder to get the same affects and effects. Everything comes down to how good you want to be and how much dedication you are willing to give.

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, Practice, Practice. 

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pchoppin
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December 18, 2018 - 2:31 pm
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@Shane "Chicken" Wang 

I see what you mean.  Again, the two types of instruments (acoustic and electric) are quite different.

An electric violin will produce a much different sound.  It's electric.  Also, the projection is controlled very differently in each.  And the weight and feel of the instruments are quite different.  Most electric violins are not constructed with the same material or in the same way as acoustic.  All of these change the way the instrument feels, is played, and how they produce sound.

Also, there is another aspect to consider.  Sound from any electric instrument, or even one which has electronic pickups added, must go through some kind of amplifier.  So the sound the listener hears isn't coming from the pure vibration from hand to ear.  What I mean by this is the speakers deliver the sound, not the player per se.  This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it is something to consider when deciding which type of instrument to play.

Some of my reasons for playing an acoustic violin do stem from the differences between acoustic vs electric.  I like the warm, pure sound of vibration which comes from my hand, rather than the sound which is produced through the electronics. This is just my preference, and also the type of music I ultimately want to play.  My goal is to play in an orchestra with a violin section.  Normally, only the acoustic violin is played in orchestras.

I also love to hold and play a wooden violin and hear the undertones and sub harmonics.  These sub harmonics are part of the characteristics of an acoustic instrument.  And I do rely on it for intonation when I am playing. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I suspect that the undertones and sub harmonics produced by acoustic violins cannot be produced with electric.

These are just my own personal preference and choice.  There are definite reasons to play electric.  For example if you are playing with other electric instruments and need to control the projection to match and meld with other instruments.  Or if you want the ability to add certain electronic distortions or change the instrument's voice based on specific styles of music, such as the difference between classical and Irish or Celtic fiddle.  There are many good reasons to chose electric.  It is all about personal preference.

- Pete -

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Amateur
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December 18, 2018 - 7:25 pm
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Personally, I don't consider the sound under the ear as an asset of the acoustic violin. The tone is quite different to the player than anyone even a few feet from the instrument. Considerably more so than acoustics not held under the chin. With the electric, you know what you hear is a better representation of what the audience hears.

Requiring an amp isn't the burden it used to be with some of the good affordable portable amps on the market now. But at the same time, working the knobs and choosing your peripherals is another skill set you'll need to learn.

I prefer the acoustic myself as I like folkier music. I have toyed around with an NS WAV and the similarly priced Yamaha in a store a few tines. Amazing instruments for the price. Superb playability and comfortable. Though the tones were different from acoustics, they were quite pleasing.

I'm going to have to buck the trend on this one. If your heart is set on electric, go with that first. What inspires and motivates you is more important than what you "should" get. Its what keeps you playing and learning.

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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December 18, 2018 - 7:42 pm
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@pchoppin 

I agree completely. If we both bought the same violins, they would still be completely different instruments, with their own voices, own maturity, own reaction time, and own personalities. I don't believe you can get that with an electric. Just my opinion.

I have said before that I am nearly deaf in my right ear and headed that way with the left, I need the resonation of the acoustic to know exactly where I am in my intonation. I can feel it on my face, in my neck, in my chest. I have one of Pierres lower line violins and it is LOUD, it gets way over the ringing, but if I have a mute on, I can't feel the vibration except in my jaw, it's aggravating.

Same with the electric guitars and bass. My buddy owns my Richenbacher acoustic electric bass, I can feel it when I play but not the solid body fender unless the amp is way up. Again, my personal opinion, if the end goal is to play in a group, band, orchestra, you need to be able to feel what your playing as well as hear it. People talk of tuning your ears, You should tune your entire being, become the music. You don't have to be a spiritual person to know that at some point it becomes a spiritual happening. 

I don't really want to get into an electric violin until I go completely deaf, but if a person was wanting to learn electric, they should know acoustic also really, to have the comparison, the reflection, of one to the other. To be able to feel the raw emotion that comes from within.

In my most honest and purest love of music, the answers are simple, be true to yourself, be true to the music, and the instrument is just the medium. You don't have to have the most expensive, the biggest or the best. You have to be the best you can be. Learn the best you can with what you have, and let the music speak for you. Love yourself always, love what you do, and it will all show in the end. it won't matter how you got there, all that matters is that you are there, and you made the best of the journey. It's all about you.

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Mariana
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December 18, 2018 - 8:36 pm
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Yo empecé con un acústico y mucho tiempo después para poder tocar en vivo en una banda de folklore me compre un electrico busco en el eléctrico el sonido del acustico pero es imposible. Son totalmente distintos pero está bien probar los dos pero para empezar nada mejor cómo el acustico 

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Fiddlerman
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December 28, 2018 - 4:51 pm
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Learning on a solid body electric has one advantage over acoustic violins, which is that they can be played very quietly. 🙂
It's not as fun IMO but it's definitely possible.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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