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International Talk Like A Pirate Day Project
Aaaaaar.... The festivities have begun
Topic Rating: 4.9 Topic Rating: 4.9 Topic Rating: 4.9 Topic Rating: 4.9 Topic Rating: 4.9 Topic Rating: 4.9 (23 votes) 
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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
September 2, 2014 - 3:35 am
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@Ferret I watch your video every morn'... What great creativity and editing.

@BillyG thank fer helpin' me with being a polite lassie... "Doon the ears is much better than" what's fillin' out the trousers!  And the compliments will get you out of the brigg. Thank you.

@cdennyb you did a good thing showin the folks my out takes... Keeping me humble are ye?  Thank you.

fare the well... Thanks to a great party kickoff from pirate Johnny!

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Ferret
Byron Bay Australia
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September 2, 2014 - 5:28 pm
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Arrrrrrrrrrr

Here be some Pirate trivia for ye so that ye be understandin' what Sea Shanties be.

It be a fare long read so grab the rum bottle and get all comfy now.

So, What be a "Sea Shanty"?

Sea shanties (singular "shanty", also spelled "chantey"; derived from the French word "chanter", 'to sing') were shipboard working songs. Shanties flourished from at least the fifteenth century through the days of steam ships in the first half of the 20th century. Most surviving shanties date from the nineteenth and (less commonly) eighteenth centuries.

In the days when human muscles were the only power source available aboard ship, sea shanties served a practical purpose: the rhythm of the song served to synchronize the movements of the shipworkers as they toiled at repetitive tasks. They also served a social purpose: singing, and listening to song, is pleasant; it alleviates boredom, and lightens the burden of hard work, of which there was no shortage on long voyages.

Most shanties are "call and response" songs, with one voice (the shantyman) singing the line and the chorus of sailors bellowing the response (compare military cadence calls). For example, the shanty "Boney":

Shantyman:
Boney was a warrior,
All:
Way, hey, ya!
Shantyman:
A warrior and a terrier,
All:
Jean-François!
The crew would then pull on the last syllable of the response in each line

Categories
Shanties may be divided into several rough categories:

Short Drag
Shanty
Short drag or short haul shanties were for tasks that required quick pulls over a relatively short time, such as shortening or unfurling sails. When working in rough weather these songs kept the sailors in a rhythm that got the job done safely and efficiently.

Long Drag
Shanty
Long drag or halyard shanties were for work that required more setup time between pulls. It was used for heavy labour that went on for a long time, for example, raising or lowering a heavy sail. This type of shanty gave the sailors a rest in between the hauls, a chance to get a breath and a better grip, and coordinated their efforts to make the most of the group’s strength for the next pull. This type of shanty usually has a chorus at the end of each line.

Capstan
Shanty
Capstan (or windlass) shanties were used for long or repetitive tasks that simply need a sustained rhythm. Raising or lowering the anchor by winding up the heavy anchor chain was their prime use. This winding was done by walking round and round pushing at the capstan bars, a long and continuous effort. These are the most developed of the work shanties.

Pumping
Shanties
All wooden ships leak somewhat. There was a special hold (cargo area) in the ships where the leaked-in water (the bilge) would collect: the bilge hold. The bilge water had to be pumped out frequently; on period ships this was done with a two-man pump. Many pumping shanties were also used as capstan shanties, and vice versa, particularly after the adoption of the Downton pump which used a capstan rather than pump handles moved up and down. Examples include: "Strike The Bell", "Shallow Brown", "Barnacle Bill the Sailor", "Lowlands".

Forecastle
Shanties
In the evening, when the work was done, it was time to relax. Singing was a favored method of entertainment. These songs came from places visited, reminding the sailors of home or foreign lands. Naturally the sailors loved to sing songs of love, adventure, pathos, famous men, and battles. Of course after all the hard work just plain funny songs topped their list.

Stamp-'n'-Go
Shanties
These were used only on ships with large crews. Many hands would take hold of a line 'tug-of-war' style and march away along the deck singing and stamping out the rhythm. Alternatively, with a larger number of men, they would create a loop -- marching along with the line, letting go at the 'end' of the loop and marching back to the 'top' of the loop to take hold again for another trip. These songs tend to have longer choruses similar to capstan shanties. Examples: "Drunken Sailor", "Roll the Old Chariot". Stan Hugill, in his Shanties from the Seven Seas writes: "(Drunken Sailor) is a typical example of the stamp-'n'-go song or walkaway or runaway shanty, and was the only type of work-song allowed in the King's Navee (sic). It was popular in ships with big crews when at halyards; the crowd would seize the fall and stamp the sail up. Sometimes when hauling a heavy boat up the falls would be 'married' and both hauled on at the same time as the hands stamped away singing this rousing tune."

Whaling
Shanties
Life on a whaler was worse than on any other type of vessel; your life might be shorter on a pirate’s ship, but the work wouldn't be so hard! Voyages typically lasted from two to three years, and sailor’s lives were filled with unrelenting, dangerous work and the ever-present stench of whale oil. Whalers risked maiming and death when giving chase in small boats that were often overturned or even smashed by the whale’s tail in the fight! Songs helped give these men the will to go on in the face of their ful circumstances.

Of course, the above categories are not absolute. Sailors could (and did) take a song from one category and, with necessary alterations to the rhythm, use it for a different task. The only rule almost always followed was that songs that spoke of returning home were only sung on the homeward leg, and songs that sung of the joys of voyaging etc., were only sung on the outward leg. Other songs were very specific. "Poor Old Man" (also known as "Poor Old Horse" or "The Dead Horse") was sung once the sailors had worked off their advance (the "horse") a month or so into the voyage. "Leave Her, Johnny Leave Her" (also known as "Time for Us to Leave Her") was only sung during the last round of pumping the ship dry once it was tied up in port, prior to leaving the ship at the end of the voyage.

The shantyman
The shantyman was a sailor who led the others in singing. He was usually self-appointed. A sailor would not generally sign on as a shantyman per se, but took on the role in addition to their other tasks on the ship. Nevertheless, sailors reputed to be good shantymen were valuable and respected — it was a good professional skill to have, along with strong arms and back.

Performance of shanties
Historically, shanties were usually not sung ashore. Today, they are performed as popular music. Shanty choirs, often large choral groups that perform only sea shanties, are popular in Europe, particularly Poland and the Netherlands, but also countries such as Germany and Norway. In English-speaking countries, sea shanties are comparatively less popular as a separate genre and tend to be performed by smaller groups as folk music rather than in a choral style. They are also sung by some folk music clubs as a social pastime, not for performance. A medley of sea shanties performed by classical orchestra, Sir Henry Wood's Fantasia on British Sea Songs, is a popular component of the Last Night of the Proms in Britain.

Although the "days of the tall ships" are over, the shanty song style is still used for new musical compositions. Well known examples include the Stan Rogers song, "Barrett's Privateers," the Steve Goodman song, "Lincoln Park Pirates," and the theme song for the television show SpongeBob SquarePants (a version of "Blow the Man Down"). Even the song "Reise, Reise" by the German Tanz-Metall band Rammstein is based on a shanty, "Reise, Reise."

Source: http://thepirateking.com/music....._types.htm

Seen it all. Done it all. Can't remember most of dunno ..... What was I saying???? facepalm

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ratvn
Kent, Washington USA
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September 2, 2014 - 5:44 pm
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Oh, this is great, @Ferret, John.

So much great information to learn.

Thanks for the post.

thumbs-up

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
September 2, 2014 - 5:53 pm
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Wow John.!!! clapclapclapclap That was so good.. so interesting and fun.

Thank you for posting mate!

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Ferret
Byron Bay Australia
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September 3, 2014 - 12:21 am
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Arrrrrrrrrrr

Cap'n Ferret here.

I'd been noticin' that some of ye scurvy dogs have expressed a lack of knowin' of how to 'talk like a pirate'. 

So I be postin' a hole 'ship load' of piratey terms for yer consideration. Again, it be a fare long read. So get that rum bottle out again and get nice and comfy and learn some pirate talk.

Arrrrrrrrrr

Pirate Talk fer ye

To start with, of course, say "ye" for you, "me" for my or mine, and don't skimp on the "ahoy" and "arrrrr!"

Addled  Mad, insane, or just stupid. An "addlepate" is a fool.

Aft  Short for "after." Toward the rear of the shiip

Ahoy   Hello!

Avast!    Hey! Could also be used as "Stop that!" or "Who goes there?"

Begad!    By God!

Belay    Stop that. "Belay that talk!" would mean "Shut up!"

Bilge!   BNonsense, or foolish talk. The bilges of a ship are the lowest parts, inside the hull along the keel. They fill with stinking bilgewater—or just "bilge."
Bilge-sucking A very uncomplimentary adjective.

Black Spot.   To "place the Black Spot" on another pirate is to sentence him to death, to warn him he is marked for death, or sometimes just to accuse him of a serious crime before other pirates.

Blaggard.   Blackguard. An insult.

Blimey!    An exclamation of surprise.

Booty    Loot.

Bosun.   Boatswain, a petty officer.

Bucko.   Familiar term. "Me bucko" = "my friend."

Cap'n.   Short for "captain."

Cat o'nine tails.   A whip with many lashes, used for flogging. "A taste of the cat" might refer to a full flogging, or just a single blow to "smarten up" a recalcitrant hand.

Chantey.   A sailor's work song. Also spelled "shantey" or "shanty."

Corsair.   A more romantic term for pirate. But still a pirate.

Davy Jones' locker.   The bottom of the sea.

Deadlights.   Eyes. "Use yer deadlights, matey!"

Dead men tell no tales.   Standard pirate excuse for leaving no survivors.

Dog.   A mild insult, perhaps even a friendly one.

Doubloon.   A Spanish gold coin. At different times, it was worth either 4 or 16 silver pesos, or "pieces of eight."

Fair winds!    Goodbye, good luck!

Feed the fish.   What you do when you are thrown into the sea, dead or alive.

Gangway!    "Get out of my way!"

Godspeed!    Goodbye, good luck!

Grub.  Food.

Fore, or forrard.  Toward the front end of the ship.

Flogging.   Punishment by caning, or by whipping with the cat.

Hands.  The crew of a ship; sailors.

Handsomely.  Quickly. "Handsomely now, men!" = "Hurry up!"

Jack Ketch.  The hangman. To dance with Jack Ketch is to hang.

Jollyboat.  A small but happy craft, perhaps even one which is a little dinghy.

Jolly Roger.   The pirates' skull-and-crossbones flag. It was an invitation to surrender, with the implication that those who surrendered would be treated well. A red flag indicated "no quarter."

Keelhaul.  Punishment by dragging under the ship, from one side to the other. The victim of a keelhauling would be half-drowned, or worse, and lacerated by the barnacles that grew beneath the ship.

Kiss the gunner's daughter.  A punishment: to be bent over one of the ship's guns and flogged.

Lad, lass, lassie.   A way to address someone younger than you.

Landlubber or just lubber.   A non-sailor.

Lights Lungs.   A pirate might threaten to "have someone's lights and liver."

Line.    A rope in use as part of the ship's rigging, or as a towing line. When a rope is just coiled up on deck, not yet being used for anything, it's all right to call it a rope.
Lookout Someone posted to keep watch on the horizon for other ships or signs of land

Maroon.   A common punishment for violation of a pirate ship's articles, or offending her crew. The victim was left on a deserted coast (or, island) with few supplies. That way, no one could say that the unlucky pirate had actually been killed by his former brethren.

Me.    A piratical way to say "my."

Me hearties.  Typical way for a pirate leader to address his crew.

Matey.   A piratical way to address someone in a cheerful, if not necessarily
friendly, fashion.

No quarter!    Surrender will not be accepted.

Piece of eight.    A Spanish silver coin worth one peso or 8 reales. It was sometimes literally cut into eight pieces, each worth one real.

Pillage.    To raid, rob, and sack a target ashore.

Pirate.   A seagoing robber and murderer. Contrast with privateer.

Poop deck.   The highest deck at the aft end of a large ship. Smaller ships don't have a poop; the highest part aft is the quarterdeck.

Poxy, poxed     Diseased. Used as an insult.

Rope's end.  Another term for flogging. "Ye'll meet the rope's end for that, me bucko!"

Rum.   Traditional pirate drink.

Rum.   Strange or odd. A "rum fellow" is a peculiar person, the sort who won't say "Arrrr!" on Talk Like A Pirate Day.

Sail ho!    "I see a ship!" The sail, of course, is the first part of a ship visible over the horizon.

Salt, old salt.   An experienced seaman.

Scurvy.    (1) A deficiency disease caused by lack of vitamin C, often afflicting sailors;

(2) A derogatory adjective for an epithet, as in "Ye scurvy dogs!"
Sea dog An experienced seaman.

Shanty.    Another spelling for "chantey" - a sea song.

Shark bait
(1) Your foes, who are about to feed the fish (q.v.).
(2) A worthless or lazy sailor; a lubber who is no use aboard ship.

Shiver me timbers!    An expression of surprise or strong emotion.

Sink me!    An expression of surprise.

Smartly.  Quickly. "Smartly there, men!" = "Hurry up!"

Splice the mainbrace.    To have a drink. Or, perhaps, several drinks.

Spyglass.   A telescope.

Starboard.    The right side of the ship when you are facing toward her prow.

Sutler.    A merchant in port, selling what a ship needed for supplies and repairs.

Swab.    A disrespectful term for a seaman. "Man that gun, ye cowardly swabs!"

Swab.    To clean something. "Swabbing the decks" would be a mild penalty for a disobedient pirate.

Swag.   Loot.

Wench.   An individual of the female persuasion. "Saucy" is a good adjective to add to this, and if ye can get away with "Me proud beauty,” more power to ye!

Yo-ho-ho.   A very piratical thing to say, whether it actually means anything or not.

Source: http://www.tide-mark.com/pirat....._dict.html

Seen it all. Done it all. Can't remember most of dunno ..... What was I saying???? facepalm

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cdennyb
King for a Day, Peasant for many
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September 3, 2014 - 12:48 am
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ok, damn, enough already... mr encyclopedia... I never knew that much about pirates and I probably was one in a past life! LoLfacepalm

"If you practice with your hands you must practice all day. Practice with your mind and you can accomplish the same amount in minutes." Nathan Milstein

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
September 3, 2014 - 12:52 am
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Ok... mates.... We've had 3 brave submissions... Cover ye eye and wake up your instrument... Play a tune with us....

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Ferret
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September 3, 2014 - 1:11 am
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coolpinkone said
Ok... mates.... We've had 3 brave submissions... Cover ye eye and wake up your instrument... Play a tune with us....

@coolpinkone 

Pinky La Cool has got it right. Let's stop the talkin' and start the playin'. 

Lest hear some music from yer all. violin-student

Arrrrrrrrrr.

 @cdennyb Dennis

Well ye be knowin' somethin' today that ye weren't be knowin' yesterday. A good outcome I be thinkin'  🙂

Seen it all. Done it all. Can't remember most of dunno ..... What was I saying???? facepalm

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
September 3, 2014 - 7:34 am
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@Toni and Dennis - Such a great example of how time consuming and difficult it can be to make a video. Many people think you just turn on the video recorder, press record, upload and post it. Rarely the case!!!

Thanks for sharing :)

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
September 3, 2014 - 2:16 pm
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Thanks Pierre.  I had like 60 takes and I was telling Den that I was laughing myself to death over my out takes and fish faces... he said send some over and then He put them for a bloopers video.   It cracked me up.. All the times I thought the camera was off.. ha ha... He was kind with his comments.  I would have put some meaner ones.. Like "what the hell kind of face is that?"  lol

It's all fun.  🙂

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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BillyG
Brora, North-east Scotland
September 3, 2014 - 3:07 pm
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LOL @coolpinkone and @cdennyb - I loved the out-takes as much as the finished version !  Cool !

.... Got my tunes pretty-much nailed here - bit of final video editing to do.... hehehhe (evil grin!) - totally ready here to make a total a$$ of myself !  Yeahhhhhhh.... it'll be posted soon!   Messing with the green-screen overlay ( man, I gotta try to keep up wi' that old scurvy dog Cap'n Ferret !   LOL John - you've done a great job not only in kicking this project off, but taking the time and effort to do the clever vid - good on yah! cap'n !!!!)

[  Arrrr, been a grim day on the old seas here in the northern wastes of the Atlantic, arrrr....   Oh- ok - I exaggerate somewhat, landlubber that I am...   it's just been a bit overcast with a gentle breeze....    was just trying to add "atmosphere" to my post ]

ROFL !

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes. D'oh - guntohead.JPG

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
September 3, 2014 - 3:26 pm
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argh..  and yo ho ho...I love your sense of humor.  And I'd love to see what you  post.

I am looking for another tune so that I can make an arse out of myself once again.

Can't wait to hear what shanty tune you'll be playing.

Fairwinds to ye!

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Ferret
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September 3, 2014 - 4:31 pm
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@cdennyb 

Aye, I did forget to mention that 'I' too enjoyed them Pinky La Cool out takes. They where mighty entertainin'.

If I where to post me out takes I would have to do some sound editin' cause what I be sayin sometimes would make a tavern wench blush. Arrrrrr

@coolpinkone 

Arrrrrrrr Ahoy Ms Pinky La Cool. It would be pleasin' if you where to give us all another tune lassie. I be looking forward to it.

@BillyG 

Avast Mad Bill you scurvy bilge rat. I be thinkin' that ye may be thinkin' bout knockin' this old parrot of his perch. Just ye be rememberin that mutiny be a keelhaulin' offence Arrrrrr. Ye can be bringin' it on. LOL

Havin' said that. I just can't be waiting to set me deadlights on ye performance.

 

Shiver me timbers me hearties. All this 'Pirate Talk' be makin' the autocorrect on this here iPad be havin' convulsions. Arrrrrrr LOL

Seen it all. Done it all. Can't remember most of dunno ..... What was I saying???? facepalm

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coolpinkone
California, the place of my heart
September 3, 2014 - 5:34 pm
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ha ha ha Ferret.. auto correct and pirate talk that is not a good combo!!   I  love how you all talk like pirates.  I hope I am learning.  🙂

I did not send Den the parts where I said the "blush" words. :)  I can talk like a drunken sailor too. (shocking, I know)

 

ps... on my lunch break looking for a new tune.  I don't know any of the songs so it makes it harder to learn for me from sheet. :)

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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VickieD
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September 3, 2014 - 5:47 pm
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Ahoy! Buckos,

It's been a fun readin' your afts and forths.

Super job t' @Ferret and @coolpinkone on t' submissions - very fun t' listen to – and Ferrett – very interestin' readin' on t' pirate trivia - thanks for postin'.

@cdennyb - how fun your video on cpo - very creative and very cute.

This be me contribution t' t' cause. Medley o’Amsterdam Maid, Blow the Man Down, Barnacle Bill the Sailor, and What Shall we do with the Druken Sailor.

Sorry, in t' process o' movin' so no pirate costume - Forgive th' cheesy hat.

Now lets see if I can spy wit' just one eye.

Fair Winds mates!

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"A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin; what else does a man need to be happy?
~~Albert Einstein

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coolpinkone
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September 3, 2014 - 5:55 pm
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@VickieD that was a mighty fine melody of tunes.  I loved loved loved it!

We have ourselves a talented ship O mates!

and the lassie has one eye nonetheless! 

I think ye shall get the privey of eating first from the bung hole and an extra tankard of rum.

Welcome to the party... and we are off and running. 

Thanks John/Ferret!

Vibrato Desperato.... Desperately seeking vibrato

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Ferret
Byron Bay Australia
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September 3, 2014 - 6:11 pm
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@VickieD 

Avast Lassie. What a darn fine performance that was. It had me doin' a gig on the poop deck.

I be thankin' ye for joining the party. Arrrrrrrrr

And shiver me timbers Lass. I was thinkin that your tricorn and eye patch where lookin just dandy. Thank ye for the spirit. :)

Seen it all. Done it all. Can't remember most of dunno ..... What was I saying???? facepalm

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KindaScratchy
Massachusetts
September 3, 2014 - 10:45 pm
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Yo, ho, ho and a bottle of rum! Those were great videos, John, Toni and Vickie!

Arrrgghh. I'd better get my act together and get my video recorded or I'll have to walk the plank!

When the work's all done and the sun's settin' low,

I pull out my fiddle and I rosin up the bow.

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KindaScratchy
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September 3, 2014 - 10:54 pm
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Ferret said
It had me doin' a gig on the poop deck.

I think there's medicine for that for that, John. ;)

When the work's all done and the sun's settin' low,

I pull out my fiddle and I rosin up the bow.

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Ferret
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September 4, 2014 - 12:14 am
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KindaScratchy said

Ferret said
It had me doin' a gig on the poop deck.

I think there's medicine for that for that, John. ;)

@KindaScratchy 

Arrrrrrrrrr. Yes lassie. So there be. But I can be tellin' ye now. It won't be Cap'n Ferret swabbing the deck. That's what ye have a scurvy crew for. rofl

Seen it all. Done it all. Can't remember most of dunno ..... What was I saying???? facepalm

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