FORUM

Welcome to our forum. A Message To Our New and Prospective Members . Check out our Forum Rules. Lets keep this forum an enjoyable place to visit.

Please feel free to share. “The Little Drummer Boy Project”

A A A
Avatar
Please consider registering
guest
sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register
Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_Related Related Topics sp_TopicIcon
The Six Foot Fiddle - finished at last!
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
Avatar
Sofia Leo
Springfield, Oregon
Honorary advisor
Members

Regulars
August 31, 2011 - 6:14 pm
Member Since: April 6, 2011
Forum Posts: 466
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
41sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

pky said:

CatMcCall, what tools would I need if I'm going to start with a kit?

It all depends on how much you want to modify the kit to make it better. I've documented the tools that I used/made on my blog, The Fiddle Project.

A couple of scrapers are nice to have, and you can make your own for a fraction of the cost of "real" scrapers, not to mention that you can shape them to suit yourself and I bet you'll find a million uses for them once you master the concepts.

Hide glue - can be found very cheaply on eBay. Yes, you really, really, really do want to use hide glue.

Something to heat the glue in - I use a tiny potpourri candle holder, a metal jello mold and a tiny canning jar - total cost $2.24 and it works just as well as an expensive glue pot.

Spool clamps are nice for "closing the box," and can be made very cheaply.

A neck gauge is handy and can also be made from scrap wood, or you can use a couple of steel rulers.

A curling iron to bend the purfling - not totally required, but it sure makes setting in the purfling easier.

An x-acto or similar knife will clean out the purfling grooves easily and cheaply. It will also shape the edges and to a number of other tasks that "they" say require special tools.

A flat chisel, 1/2" wide to mortise the neck. I borrowed one from a woodworker friend until I decide just what kind I want to buy.

A small, sharp saw for cutting down the heel.

A tiny drill and bit to drill the string holes in the pegs - I use a tiny hand drill that I found at a craft store - works fine, I think it cost about $2 and it came with several tiny drill bits.

Sandpaper.

Shellac and varnish. Bull's Eye de-waxed shellac can be found at your local ACE hardware, as can Spar Varnish (not the poly-whatever!) which works just dandy if thinned a bit.

You can make do with the above, or buy a bunch of fancy tools if you choose. You may have what you need laying around the house - be creative if you have more time than cash (don't we all!) and find a way to avoid purchasing specialized tools that you won't be able to use for anything but fiddle building. I mean, what if you don't like it? surprised

Mary in Springfield, Oregon http://www.thefiddleandbanjopr.....dpress.com

Avatar
myguitarnow
Laguna Beach
Pro advisor
Members

Regulars
August 31, 2011 - 8:51 pm
Member Since: June 16, 2011
Forum Posts: 1094
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
42sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

Cool Cat! I'll send you an email. A kit would be fine. I can stamp it made in the good old USA!

Avatar
Sofia Leo
Springfield, Oregon
Honorary advisor
Members

Regulars
August 31, 2011 - 8:56 pm
Member Since: April 6, 2011
Forum Posts: 466
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
43sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

myguitarnow said:

Cool Cat! I'll send you an email. A kit would be fine. I can stamp it made in the good old USA!

Uh...well, it could be stamped "assembled in the USA from Chinese sourced materials" smile My label actually says "Fecit in Oregon" and I guess I should add a USA onto the end of that.

Mary in Springfield, Oregon http://www.thefiddleandbanjopr.....dpress.com

Avatar
myguitarnow
Laguna Beach
Pro advisor
Members

Regulars
August 31, 2011 - 10:13 pm
Member Since: June 16, 2011
Forum Posts: 1094
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
44sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

However you want to stamp it. You are the one making it so you can still say made in the USA. Fender guitars have been getting away with it for many years now 😉

 

By the way, you've got mail.

Avatar
David Burns
Winfield, Missouri
Honorary advisor
Members

Regulars
September 1, 2011 - 6:08 am
Member Since: June 24, 2011
Forum Posts: 425
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
45sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

myguitarnow said:

However you want to stamp it. You are the one making it so you can still say made in the USA. Fender guitars have been getting away with it for many years now 😉

 

By the way, you've got mail.

Assembled in USA from Chinese parts?

Avatar
Sofia Leo
Springfield, Oregon
Honorary advisor
Members

Regulars
September 1, 2011 - 1:31 pm
Member Since: April 6, 2011
Forum Posts: 466
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
46sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

David Burns said:

Assembled in USA from Chinese parts?

The kits come from a factory in China - complete with a red stamp in Chinese lettering.

Technically, I think if it's assembled in the USA, no matter where the parts come from it can be labeled "Made in the USA." There is quite a row going about textile products being assembled in other countries and then having a "Made in the USA" label sewn in as a last step before sale, and it's enough to qualify. The rules are always changing.

I think it's incredibly deceptive to label a foreign product as domestic for sale - there are many of us who prefer to buy things that actually were made in the USA, and would reject those products only labeled as being domestic out of hand.

Unfortunately, there aren't any fiddle kits that are made in the USA that I have found. Even respectable violin shops source their fiddles overseas, finishing them in the shop and calling them "shop made." The whole industry is a bit crooked if you look too hard...

Mary in Springfield, Oregon http://www.thefiddleandbanjopr.....dpress.com

Avatar
myguitarnow
Laguna Beach
Pro advisor
Members

Regulars
September 1, 2011 - 6:04 pm
Member Since: June 16, 2011
Forum Posts: 1094
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
47sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

AGREE CAT!

Avatar
artroland
Illinois
Advanced member
Members
September 3, 2011 - 10:08 am
Member Since: September 2, 2011
Forum Posts: 72
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
48sp_Permalink sp_Print
0

Coming from the electric side of things with basses, I've always wanted to make my own bass, and through research, I've always preferred swamp ash for how light it feels but how dense and tight it plays. My Yamaha RBX300 is constructed like that and I've really enjoyed how distinctly it carries each note, especially with Seymour Duncan pickups in it. 

Now, how that would translate to a violin, and especially and electric one, would be an interesting exploration. I've enjoyed looking at your work and reading on your blog! Thanks much for sharing!

One wonders if the damage would have been as severe had the chicken not been tied to the barrel.

Forum Timezone: America/New_York
Most Users Ever Online: 696
Currently Online: cid
Guest(s) 13
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Members Birthdays
sp_BirthdayIcon
Today None
Upcoming JPferrman, Designer 88, LyleA, BaldBeardedViolinist, Stephen, AnnyJ, Trisha, wonderputz, Russionleo
Top Posters:
Mad_Wed: 2849
Barry: 2679
Fiddlestix: 2647
Oliver: 2439
DanielB: 2379
Kevin M.: 1971
damfino: 1945
cdennyb: 1815
TerryT: 1728
Ferret: 1575
Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 3
Members: 27169
Moderators: 0
Admins: 7
Forum Stats:
Groups: 16
Forums: 56
Topics: 8366
Posts: 104040
Newest Members:
KrisK, 1 Whiz Kid, music_master, PandoraV2, Abelardo, CrookedBill
Administrators: Fiddlerman: 14986, KindaScratchy: 1754, coolpinkone: 4176, BillyG: 3271, MrsFiddlerman: 2, Jimmie Bjorling: 0, cid: 1803