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The A string
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (1 votes) 
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Mark
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December 1, 2018 - 2:48 am
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Crushing the sound up the neck of the fiddle in my case is lack of technique.

But I'm sure the better tone woods used on the better instruments plus the top and bottom plates are carverd thinner and with better proportions, just over all better construction allows the resinating box of the fiddle to vibrate and resonate better than plates that are to thick and not proportioned properly, and final assembly that's not quite as good as it could be.     Just my thoughts.

Mark

Master the Frog and you have mastered the bow.

Albert Sammons

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Gordon Shumway
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Mark said
Crushing the sound up the neck of the fiddle in my case is lack of technique.  

Yes, it does require technique. That's the problem with a lot of our questions - answers have to take into account that it may be the asker's problem (since I'm the original asker).

I've been planning the year ahead (and into 2020), trying to work out when to upgrade my fiddle and was thinking after doing the equivalent of Suzuki level 6 and being introduced to 6th and 7th positions might be a good time, but last night I did some stretching on my Stentor and it seemed comfortable in 9th position, although I wasn't.

Andrew

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AndrewH
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Mark said
Crushing the sound up the neck of the fiddle in my case is lack of technique.

But I'm sure the better tone woods used on the better instruments plus the top and bottom plates are carverd thinner and with better proportions, just over all better construction allows the resinating box of the fiddle to vibrate and resonate better than plates that are to thick and not proportioned properly, and final assembly that's not quite as good as it could be.     Just my thoughts.

Mark  

 

I agree with this. Many beginner-level violins have thick plates that don't resonate well in the upper register. I knew they tended to be thicker, but I didn't realize just how much thicker until about a year ago, when I had a conversation with Billy in the chat where I learned that his first Chinese violin was quite a bit heavier than my viola.

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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I know the violin is an instrument where assumptions and traditional thoughts can't be applied. Each string plays differently. Thinner and lighter is better. Older is preferred. you look forward to a new instrument to age. I love it but it's right out of the twilight zone.

I'm pretty sure a lot of it has to with the flexibility in my wrist and the pressure applied changing from frog to tip. Trying to get the paint brush motion going on. I'm sure it will come with practice and conditioning.

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Ferenc Simon
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AndrewH said

 

I agree with this. Many beginner-level violins have thick plates that don't resonate well in the upper register. I knew they tended to be thicker, but I didn't realize just how much thicker until about a year ago, when I had a conversation with Billy in the chat where I learned that his first Chinese violin was quite a bit heavier than my viola.  

Oh yea, definitely! I remember my Chinese violin weighed like twice as much as the one I have now! 

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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Ferenc Simon said

Oh yea, definitely! I remember my Chinese violin weighed like twice as much as the one I have now!   

What do you have now?

@Gordon Shumway my 4th grade music teacher played an old Stentor and it sounded beautifully, looked worn out but he treated it like a gold nugget.

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wtw
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Same here, my first (chinese) viola was heavier than the one I have now (not catastrophically though - could still hold it without effort or tension.)

The sound I get on the upper part of the neck is definitely lack of technique for me. Same for the sound I get on the C string :( (so don't even ask about what happens high on the C string violin-bang)

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Gordon Shumway
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Stentors are fine instruments, although there are probably unnecessarily many models within too narrow a price range, but some of the antique ones fetch high prices (I've seen one for $1300).

I've never measured the weight of a violin, but my practice mute never came off my $45 Chinese violin until a few months back for the first time and it was frighteningly loud, so I'm not too interested in how thick the wood is.

Andrew

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Fiddlerman
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December 3, 2018 - 10:55 am
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markcobb said
I have another question.Pierre talks about crushing notes usually on high on the G string and how the more expensive better made violins mostly don't. What is the cause of the crushing notes? I mean' what is is about the violin that allows the note to be crushed? Is it the tail piece or something completely different?   

Better instruments vibrate easier. They are less constricted. Playing way up on the fingerboard requires two things. Good technique or at least enough power to press the strings down hard enough to the fingerboard and the bow technique to get the string vibrating correctly. A better violin will vibrate easier and quicker and not crush, or crash or choke.... Whatever we want to call it. LOL

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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Fiddlerman said

Better instruments vibrate easier. They are less constricted. Playing way up on the fingerboard requires two things. Good technique or at least enough power to press the strings down hard enough to the fingerboard and the bow technique to get the string vibrating correctly. A better violin will vibrate easier and quicker and not crush, or crash or choke.... Whatever we want to call it. LOL  

I need to practice more then and perfect my bow technique, I think I heard a train wreck.

I have noticed that when i have pain in my right shoulder, I can make some crazy sounds and I am pretty sure that they weren't meant to be heard. Also learning that it sounds a lot better standing up than sitting down, if that makes sense.

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Fiddlerman
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December 3, 2018 - 12:18 pm
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Keep the shoulder down Mark. Usually what gives pain is lifting that shoulder. It's really hard to correct bad habits so it's best you nip it in the bud. :)

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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wtw
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More power pressing down… I'll try that, thank you. Bow technique to get the string to vibrate correctly is a big mystery, will need some more time !

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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Fiddlerman said
Keep the shoulder down Mark. Usually what gives pain is lifting that shoulder. It's really hard to correct bad habits so it's best you nip it in the bud. :)   

My right shoulder was torn out of socket years ago pulling a marine out of a bad situation. Hurts like hell when it gets cold, but so does everything else. I'm just falling apart.

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Fiddlerman
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December 7, 2018 - 9:58 am
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Seems to me that the VA should be able to help you with that. What do they say about a possible operation to correct it?

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Shane "Chicken" Wang
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Fiddlerman said
Seems to me that the VA should be able to help you with that. What do they say about a possible operation to correct it?  

That would be like going to walmart to get a tooth pulled. Aint gonna happen. Just a matter of having multiple injuries and arthritis setting in. I tried to live life to the fullest and didn't expect to survive this long.

My mother had shoulder surgery over a year ago and can't raise her arm high enough to do her hair and that was with a real doctor. 

They don't show the downsides in the commercials. Jump out of enough planes, your knees give out, hell if you run enough your knees give out. Every time you exercise, you tear muscles, you suffer micro fractures, tendons tighten, ligaments tighten, (which fatigues the joint) and cartilage is worn down. In your prime, it's great because it is needed to become healthier, but all that adds up as we age. When my bones started breaking and fracturing it came much earlier than it was supposed to. I have the bone density of 70 year old man. 5 months ago I broke my middle finger pulling the lever of an angle bender. Just POW. 

I really need to learn how to scream like a little girl, probably a hi C, a hard note to hit on the A string. (Full circle and back on subject)

coffee1

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