FORUM

Welcome to our forum. A Message To Our New and Prospective Members . Check out our Forum Rules. Lets keep this forum an enjoyable place to visit.

Please feel free to share. “Game of Thrones Group Project”

A A A
Avatar
Please consider registering
guest
sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register
Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
The Minor Third Communicates Sadness in Speech, Mirroring Its Use in Music
speech compared to singing
Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 Topic Rating: 0 (0 votes) 
Avatar
RosinedUp
Honorary tenured advisor
Members

Regulars
March 19, 2014 - 11:27 pm
Member Since: September 7, 2012
Forum Posts: 985
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

http://ase.tufts.edu/psycholog.....motion.pdf

The Minor Third Communicates Sadness in Speech, Mirroring Its Use in Music
Meagan E. Curtis and Jamshed J. Bharucha
Tufts University
There is a long history of attempts to explain why music is perceived as expressing emotion. The relationship between pitches serves as an important cue for conveying emotion in music. The musical interval referred to as the minor third is generally thought to convey sadness. We reveal that the minor third also occurs in the pitch contour of speech conveying sadness. Bisyllabic speech samples conveying four emotions were recorded by 9 actresses. Acoustic analyses revealed that the relationship between the 2 salient pitches of the sad speech samples tended to approximate a minor third. Participants rated the speech samples for perceived emotion, and the use of numerous acoustic parameters as cues for emotional identification was modeled using regression analysis. The minor third was the most reliable cue for identifying sadness. Additional participants rated musical intervals for emotion, and their ratings verified the historical association between the musical minor third and sadness. These findings support the theory that human vocal expressions and music share an acoustic code for communicating sadness. 
Keywords: emotions, communication, prosody, music and emotion, musical intervals

Avatar
Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
March 20, 2014 - 1:15 pm
Member Since: September 26, 2010
Forum Posts: 15181

Very interesting. Thanks

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

Avatar
Mad_Wed
Russia, Tatarstan rep. Kazan city
Members

Regulars
March 21, 2014 - 8:25 am
Member Since: October 7, 2011
Forum Posts: 2849
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Cool! i was suspecting something like this, but it's cool to read that scientific explanation. Thanks for the article, RosinedUp!

Forum Timezone: America/New_York
Most Users Ever Online: 696
Currently Online:
Guest(s) 41
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Members Birthdays
sp_BirthdayIcon
Today Helene
Upcoming coolpinkone, ADK-Mark, ErViolista, Nokturne, RosinRepublic, Panda-P, OP Alaraasakka, KarenSquared, Shane "Chicken" Wang, PoisonJay, ClaireS
Top Posters:
Mad_Wed: 2849
Barry: 2679
Fiddlestix: 2647
Oliver: 2439
DanielB: 2379
Kevin M.: 1971
damfino: 1970
cdennyb: 1815
TerryT: 1728
Ferret: 1575
Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 3
Members: 27306
Moderators: 0
Admins: 7
Forum Stats:
Groups: 16
Forums: 58
Topics: 8602
Posts: 106861
Newest Members:
Jq Sc, fasdfsee, babygirl7285, brego93, jaisons
Administrators: Fiddlerman: 15181, KindaScratchy: 1756, coolpinkone: 4176, BillyG: 3457, MrsFiddlerman: 2, Jimmie Bjorling: 0, cid: 2159