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YouTube Vids of Great Violinists
I have my favorites, but I am always looking for more...
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (3 votes) 
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pchoppin
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May 15, 2018 - 7:52 pm
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My favorite is Hillary Hahn, and she plays the Mendelssohn violin concerto in E minor, op 64 brilliantly. I love this video

Julia Fischer is also a genius playing Tchaikovsky violin concerto in D major, op 35 here

And Itzhak Perlman playing Brahms concert violin

Do you have others... similar genres, or other areas that you find are in this league of playing?

Thank you, I love to not only hear but see the techniques and styles of these master violinists.

Please share!

- Pete -

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AndrewH
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Rachel Barton Pine is probably my favorite violinist, but mostly for her penchant for recording lesser-known repertoire. Hilary Hahn is probably my second-favorite.

Augustin Hadelich and Vilde Frang are also well worth watching.

Another violinist I watch closely for technique and style is not a soloist: Lorenza Borrani, concertmaster of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe as well as the un-conducted orchestra Spira Mirabilis. I haven't seen anyone better at leading a section, and that's relevant to me because I'm principal violist in a community orchestra and always looking to get better in that role.

Finally, I'd like to mention violist Richard O'Neill. He has incredible stage presence, and the video of him I've linked offers an excellent example of using leg movement to give the arms a bit of extra freedom.

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
May 17, 2018 - 4:18 pm
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A bunch of fantastic violinists. 🙂 Reminds me that I need to listen to more of these great performers.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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wtw
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November 10, 2018 - 12:34 pm
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Nemanja Radulovic, here on Csardas or on Bach...

James Ehnes is impressive on The dance of the goblins or Greensleeves (viola version).

Violist Yuri Bashmet (here or here) has a big part in bringing me to the viola (his version of Mozart's Sinfonia concertante with Anne-Sophie Mutter is my favourite).

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markcobb
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November 10, 2018 - 1:42 pm
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I have become a big fan of Marisa Polesky, haven't found videos of her solo, but she does play with St Paul and the Broken Bones, and she is a I Violinist for the Memphis Symphony Orchestra.

Max Ablitzer because of his hauntingly dark music and I adore the young women that have come out like BOND, Lindsey Stirling, Taylor Davis, Hanine El Alam, and many many others. 

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bocaholly
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markcobb said
... Marisa Polesky... she is a I Violinist for the Memphis Symphony Orchestra...

How tiny is the world. The other "cool dude" (besides Fiddlerman) who does Fiddlershop Youtube presentations when he's not playing concerts himself is Michael O'Gieblyn. He was also a member of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra.  

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AndrewH
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November 10, 2018 - 8:36 pm
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Two other favorite violists: Antoine Tamestit and Isabel Villanueva.

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markcobb
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bocaholly said

markcobb said
... Marisa Polesky... she is a I Violinist for the Memphis Symphony Orchestra...

How tiny is the world. The other "cool dude" (besides Fiddlerman) who does Fiddlershop Youtube presentations when he's not playing concerts himself is Michael O'Gieblyn. He was also a member of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra.    

I know. I believe there are people in this world that come in and out of our lives, meant to change it, guide it, enrich it, and Michael and Pierre are two of those special people. I have been privileged  to see them both play in concert. They were both great musicians that would speak to us regular people with an aww shucks personality. I hope they realize what an impact they have had on people. I don't shy away from saying the reason I want to play is that the violin is the only instrument that brought me to sobbing tears. that was Pierre many years ago when I stayed in Pompano beach. I am even proud that when I play now I make people cry too, not crazy about their ears bleeding but it all works out in the end.

Michael was performing with MSO a few years ago when my son discovered there was something better than barney the purple dinosaur. (pretty sure that was when   Mei-Ann Chen was conducting.) then later my mother wanted to take everyone to nashville to see a guy she grew up knowing named Ray Price and Michael was there. Didnt get to talk to him that time. I didn't even know who Ray Price was, but I know he came to the house when I was a kid with another musician that she grew up with, went to school with, named Carl Perkins from Ridgely Tn, he wrote a song that was recorded by Elvis Presley. Elvis was a  really nice guy but he was quiet. Broke my heart when he passed away in Memphis back in 77. Mr. Carl died back in 98, and it was really miserable here. He was an amazing person, made me promise when I became famous that I would remember the kids that couldn't help themselves, and I will.

I apologize for getting so far off topic. that trip down memory lane reminded me of who I am and who I am supposed to be. It also reminded me that I'm not done in this world and still have great things to do with my own special brand of insanity. 

Thanks for being a blessing in my life Holly. I appreciate that.

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bocaholly
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November 11, 2018 - 7:27 am
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Beautifully stated @markcobb.

Glad I could jog that memory and thanks for sharing it.

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markcobb
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November 11, 2018 - 9:20 pm
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In Prodiges, the auditions, the 15 young talents perform on the theme of the 7th Art and will be accompanied by the Strasbourg Philharmonic Orchestra and the Winter Palace of Saint-Petersburg Ballet, in front of a trio of jurors composed of the soprano Élizabeth Vidal, cellist Gautier Capuçon and ballet dancer Patrick Dupond. The three best artists in each category (singing, dancing and instrument) compete in Prodiges, the final to try to succeed the 2016 winner, Marin, and win the title of "Prodigy of the Year 2017".

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Fiddlerman
Fort Lauderdale
November 12, 2018 - 3:10 pm
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markcobb said

How tiny is the world. The other "cool dude" (besides Fiddlerman) who does Fiddlershop Youtube presentations when he's not playing concerts himself is Michael O'Gieblyn. He was also a member of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra.    

I know. I believe there are people in this world that come in and out of our lives, meant to change it, guide it, enrich it, and Michael and Pierre are two of those special people. I have been privileged  to see them both play in concert. They were both great musicians that would speak to us regular people with an aww shucks personality. I hope they realize what an impact they have had on people. I don't shy away from saying the reason I want to play is that the violin is the only instrument that brought me to sobbing tears. that was Pierre many years ago when I stayed in Pompano beach. I am even proud that when I play now I make people cry too, not crazy about their ears bleeding but it all works out in the end.

Michael was performing with MSO a few years ago when my son discovered there was something better than barney the purple dinosaur..........

WOW! it really is a small small world. 

Also, pretty funny that you wrote MSO. I played as a section leader in the Malmo Symphony Orchestra for 16 years and it's written as MSO all over the place. I have a feeling there are more than just two MSO's though.

"The richest person is not the one who has the most,
but the one who needs the least."

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Bella86
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I don't know about great. I am too inexperienced to tell most of the time. (can tell if something is crap of course lol) I tend to get stuck with musicians that play a lot of emotion. I've seen plenty of players that are clearly technically skilled, but their music doesn't speak to me at all, there is no emotion. 
I got real hooked by Taylor Davis for that reason. 
But a performance I got obsessed with for a while that I still go back to sometimes is this one with Rusanda Panfili. Don't know how to make fancy links like all you forum experts lol

t=0s&list=PLVRRhOTaFVOc9fnMblIWBCLUQu39KdT8f&index=17

Also keep going back to this performance.

index=63&list=PLVRRhOTaFVOc9fnMblIWBCLUQu39KdT8f&t=0s

But yeah I can't tell if they'd be considered "great" violinists, I just got hooked on these particular performances.

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markcobb
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Taylor is a treat.

 

@Pierre, you should do some of the "professional" videos. take the carbon violin fishing out on the boat. Show the kids how it's done. with your sense of humor, it would be awesome.

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AndrewH
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Bella86 said
I don't know about great. I am too inexperienced to tell most of the time. (can tell if something is crap of course lol) I tend to get stuck with musicians that play a lot of emotion. I've seen plenty of players that are clearly technically skilled, but their music doesn't speak to me at all, there is no emotion. 

That's why Richard O'Neill is my favorite violist. I linked this earlier, but I'm embedding it so it's easier to watch.

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BillyG
Brora, North-east Scotland
November 16, 2018 - 12:27 am
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Thanks for starting the thread @pchoppin, and everyone who added to the collection - some great players and pieces featured here, cool ! 🙂

Here's one of my favorites - 

It's not the specific one I had been looking for - there's another Garrett performance of the piece where he wanders off-stage and the camera closes-in on some of the audience - they are effectively spell-bound and in some way transported to another plane of reality !  ( OK - that's a bit over-stated, but you get what I mean )

And yes - I'm still trying to get those stopped/artificial harmonics....  🙂  Grrrrrrr.....

I seriously recommend not copying my mistakes. D'oh - guntohead.JPG

Please make your own, different mistakes, and help us all learn :-)

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pchoppin
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@BillyG I felt it is important that we know and share some of the most extraordinary musicians of our time.  At least for me, understanding great music helps me play better.  It is an integral part of my own education and understanding of my violin, how to play, why to play, and from where much of the music I am playing is derived.

- Pete -

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Andrew Fryer
London, England
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November 16, 2018 - 5:14 am
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I tend to select one single performer on each instrument and listen to them exclusively.

For example, I only ever listen to Heinz Holliger on the oboe, I only ever listen to Callas sing soprano, I only ever listen to Pavarotti sing tenor.

But I diverge sometimes - I listen to about 4 guitarists (Bream, Segovia, Yepes, Williams last and least).

I haven't chosen a favourite violinist yet. However, I'm happy listening to generic baroque music with anonymous performers.

When I first saw Perlman on TV he was playing with a piano accompaniment and both pieces he finished half a measure before the piano, and I just felt he was immature, a Wunderbrat more than a Wunderkind. I like him more now, but I'm still wary of him!

I always wanted to be a juvenile delinquent but my parents wouldn't let me.

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bocaholly
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Demoiselle introduced me to Leila Schayegh (unsurprisingly baroque)the other day and loved it enough to share this trailer to her first solo album which came out in 2016.

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markcobb
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Andrew Fryer said
I tend to select one single performer on each instrument and listen to them exclusively.

@Andrew Fryer that seems to be restrictive on artistic style. I used to run into musicians that pigeon holed themselves mostly into blues, because they only listened to blues, only played blues, only knew riffs and runs that were blues. 

I listen to everything, and consider everything as a teaching aid. As a sax player, I listened to a lot of Roy Clark and Mark Knopfler, because of the different styles and twists in the way they play. They have very different styles on the guitar, but you can see by the way they play that there is no one right way. Roy Clark may have been one of the greatest guitarists to have ever played. Very underrated because of his comedic talent. Mark Knopfler on the other hand, highly talented with a completely unorthodox style, can't be comfortably taught, but it works. To try to match these guys note for note is an exercise that can cause a sax player to pass out. Can it be done? not with a cheaper instrument.

What I am saying is that I wouldn't limit myself on what I take in because I don't want to limit myself on what I put out.

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Andrew Fryer
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markcobb said

Andrew Fryer said
I tend to select one single performer on each instrument and listen to them exclusively.

@Andrew Fryer that seems to be restrictive on artistic style.

I said I tend, I didn't say it's a rule.

I agree with you concerning sopranos and tenors. But in the case of the oboe, which I played from 1973 to 1981, there's less room for artistic style. There are only two styles of playing (barring baroque): - French and German. Holliger was German but played in the lighter French style with such clarity and precision that he was a perfect role model.

In the case of singing, there's vast room for interpretation of course, but I just like the clarity of Pavarotti's voice and his perfect diction (his Donizetti arias are stunning), and Callas was the best at emotion. I was basically talking in the past to some extent - over the last years I've I've got CDs of singers like Marian Anderson, Ferrier and Lieberson (a violist before she became a singer), but they're mezzos and contraltos; I'm just not keen on many tenors (I've got a few old-time ones like McCormack and Caruso) - the highly emotional, more dramatic ones don't grab me as much - often they are just chewing the music - Domingo for example sings a lot of German with a horrible accent, lol!

Most of my listening is passive, and I guess the technical musicians are less obtrusive than the "dramatic" ones.

With apologies to the OP (since it has nothing to do with the violin), here's something I can't find on CD: -

Heinrich Boell wrote a novel called "Und Sagte Kein Einziges Wort", citing this spiritual. I guess Boell didn't know what "mumblin'" meant, lol!

@Fiddlerman MSO = Melbourne Symph?

P.S. I notice that I have Isabelle Faust playing the Bach sonatas and partitas and Simon Standage and Elizabeth Wilcock playing the concertos. That's something else - I almost always buy the cheapest secondhand discs I can find on Amazon!

I always wanted to be a juvenile delinquent but my parents wouldn't let me.

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