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Seventh & Extended Chord Harmony
Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 Topic Rating: 5 (8 votes) 
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ELCBK
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September 5, 2023 - 9:43 pm
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Seems like it's taken me an awful long time to get here... my thoughts (after torturing you all with many of my other threads) - discussion WELCOME! 

Harmony was such an important part of the Rock, Popular/Folk music I grew up with & LOVE - predominantly MINOR.  I believe it can be at least partly responsible for the soulful melancholy I love in music - emotional expression.  I'm also attracted to interesting Harmony + interesting chord progressions = unexpected. 

This past year, in particular, I've been noticing an overly abundant presence of 7th Chords used in music I like... and I wanted to learn how this might relate to my playing a tune (violin or viola), what I might consider differently in playing backup - or even looping. 

So, we sometimes imply a chord by just playing it's root, or we play double stops and also 3 or 4 note broken chords.  I see that larger chords can help music feel richer, more expressive, but I also see that if I'm not careful with extended chord inversions I might run the risk of too much tension, or just get carried away & become atonal! 😖 

Taken to the extreme. 🤣  

 

When I took a closer look at the 7th note in scales, I realized that I had been blinded by playing only what I see - not seeing what was really happening, kinda like the epiphany I had learning how the 3rd determines if a scale feels Major or Minor. 

I can see that D dorian uses the same notes as C Major (whoopee, no sharp or flats to play), but I was missing out on what was probably most important, WHY C Major sounds completely different than D dorian!  When you look at the intervals, the 1st triad chord of D dorian = D minor, they BOTH have a flatted 3rd compared to the C Major scale! 

But what about the other half of the notes in a scale?  This is where the quality of the 7th (and 6th) become important in flavoring the mood! 

Turns out I can feel free to modify the 6th & 7th scale degrees of a scale whenever it suits me, to enhance Minor Harmony!  I had to look at the interval of the 6th & 7th against the TONIC (for scales)/ROOT (for chords) to see if Major or Minor. 

maj_min_intervals.jpgImage Enlarger

I can even chose to use one (or ALL - Bach did!) of the 4 combinations of 6th's & 7th's for Minor Harmony in one piece: minor 6th/minor 7th (seen in Natural Minor), minor 6th/major 7th (seen in Harmonic Minor), major 6th/major 7th (seen in Melodic Minor) & major 6th/minor 7th (seen in Dorian)!

I'm only concerned with 7th chords at the moment - but I'm not sure which ones to use where, yet - just that I might be able use more than one kind of 7th in a piece! 🤗

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ELCBK
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...now I'm lazy, so if I can get along with less, great. 😉

I jumped at the chance to learn about "How To 'IMPLY' A Seventh Chord Harmony Using Only Two Notes Your 3 Year Old Can Play" - 😳 

Using just two notes, you can imply a seventh chord harmony and this makes it easier to play seventh chords and it doesn’t even get any easier than this. 

The title is deceiving! 

SOMEONE is playing the 'over the' note -

so it's MORE than 2 notes! 

I really didn't want to have to think about this as on piano - may have to just memorize more of these by using them on violin/viola, but I'll try to go over the tutorial again, I might see it differently.

Still, find it great to think it's possible to do something more interesting than what I have been playing.

🤔... except these aren't unusual doublestops!

The examples of 'implied' 7th harmony from the tutorial:

Minor: 

C•F - over D (for Dmin 7th)

E•A - over F# (for F#min 7th)

Major: 

C#•F# - over D (for Dmaj 7th)

B•E - over C (for Cmaj 7th)

 

Played these & a few others, but haven't tried using them in any tune I play yet.  I can see it's going to be very important to know what key I'm playing tunes in until I get used to thinking this way!  🤔... I usually don't think about key, but glad I have an open C & low F string, possibly a perfect place to start with a D minor tune!

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So, I read over the 'Implied' Seventh Chord tutorial, again.  

Just realized how common it is to use these double stops in our playing! 

🤔... It would seem 'if' I already know the 4 notes of ANY 7th chord I'm trying to 'imply'... all I really have to do is invert the 3rd & 7th - play it over the tonic. 

🤔... BUT, usually inversions are interchangeable when using chords on violin/viola/cello (in fact, we usually don't have to worry about what order we play the notes of ANY chord), so why not just use the 3rd & 7th note degrees of any scale?  Is this a case where they CANNOT be interchanged, is this 'slimmed-down' chord 'pitch order dependent' - for the 7th chord feel?  ...haven't found/figured an answer, yet. 

🤔... Now, I'm not sure (yet) of ALL the potential uses for an 'Implied' 7th chord in our playing.  If I use it for backing a tune, seems I might only use it when the tonic is played in the melody, or as a transition chord.  Not sure (yet) how to work it into a melody - maybe throw in as a transition, or else add the tonic... but the resulting 3-note chord may not be better, or easier, than the original (4-note) 7th chord. 

The 'Blues', especially, uses MANY 7th chords & may be the best place for me to experiment.

 

🤔... the tutorial mentions they'll look at the 'Implied dominant seventh chord' - but I didn't see where that was addressed. 

c-dominant-7th-chord-on-treble-clef.png

The '7th' note in a 'Dominant' 7th chord is a minor interval, so for Cmaj the 'IMPLIED' 7th chord would be: Bb & E - over C. 

 

If anyone has actually tried or thought of using these AS 'Implied' 7th Chords - please let me know!  

...I'm still learning about the qualities of the different 7th chords. 🤗

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Seventh Chords are supposed to show the root, the quality of Triad & 7th interval, plus inversion (if it is one) in their name - but some abbreviations/symbols make it harder for me to remember what their qualities are... more to memorize - or at least be able to recognize. 😊 

Types: 

Diminished° 7th (Fully-Diminished), Half-diminishedø , Minor 7th (Minor-Minor), Minor-major 7th, Dominant 7th (Major-Minor), Major 7th (Major-Major), Augmented 7th, Augmented-major 7th, Major 7th suspended 2nd, Major 7th suspended 4th, and Dominant 7th suspended 4th

Seventh-Chords-symbols.pngImage Enlarger

It is common to pair expressive qualities with seventh chords when learning what they sound like. You might think of major-major seventh chords as sounding “happy and jazzy,” major-minor seventh chords as sounding “unresolved” (like they strongly need to move to another chord), minor-minor seventh chords as “sad and jazzy,” half-diminished seventh chords as “scary and jazzy,” and fully diminished seventh chords as “very scary.”  (Seventh Cords by Chelsey Hamm - Open Music Theory)

 

I haven't listen to enough different 7th chords to determine what feel from them - that's my next mission...

'A' Minor 7th Chords

- ton of info, with Audio!!!  SEARCH THERE in the 'Chord' box for ALL other 7th Chords!  

I found Wikipedia has audio to hear the difference between inversions of 7th chords!  Don't know if it's just me, but thought the 3rd inversion had the most tension! 

 

Now, I see absolutely no reason why we can't play similar to this on VIOLIN (especially 5-string 🤭), VIOLA, and CELLO!!!  I think it's just a matter of deciding how we want the play 7th chords!

...sneaking in a little help with the pentatonic scales. 🤫 

 

8 Ways to Use Pentatonic Scales Over 7th Chords! 

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September 6, 2023 - 9:14 pm
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...I probably should've shared this video, first. 🙄 

Plus I went back & edited some of my pyschography... trying to refrain from channeling spirits into my typing until closer to Halloween. 🎃 👻

 

 

 

...starting to get some of this out of my head and into violin!

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LOVE the basicmusictheory.com site - easily find ANY set of chords/scales/modes & can download sound for them! 

Seems I've been playing quite a bit in Ador, Ddor, Gmin, Cmin, Amin - stuff I used to play in other keys (like Emin) before I started using my current tuning. 

Now I want to compare Dorian to Minor! 

A Dorian Mode:

A (tonic), B (maj 2nd), C (min 3rd), D (perf 4th), E (perf 5th), F# (maj 6th), G (min 7th)

Ador 7th Chords & Implied 7th Chords (*doublestops): 

 

i⁷ (tonic) - Amin 7th (A•C•E•G) - *(GC - over A) 

ii⁷ (supertonic) - Bmin 7th (B•D•F#•A) - *(AD - over B) 

III⁷ (mediant) - Cmaj 7th (C•E•G•B) - *(BE - over C) 

IV⁷ (subdominant) - Ddom 7th (D•F#•A•C) - *(CF# - over D) 

v⁷ (dominant) - Emin 7th (E•G•B•D) - *(DG - over E) 

viø7 (submediant) - F# half-dim 7th (F#•A•C•E) - *(EA - over F#) 

VII⁷ (subtonic) - Gmaj 7th (G•B•D•F#) - *(F#B - over G)

 

A Minor Scale:

A (tonic), B (maj 2nd), C (min 3rd), D (perf 4th), E (perf 5th), F (min 6th), G (min 7th)

Amin 7th Chords & Implied 7th Chords (*doublestops): 

 

i⁷ (tonic) - Amin 7th (A•C•E•G) - *(GC - over A) 

iiø7 (supertonic) - B half-dim 7th (B•D•F•A) - *(AD - over B) 

III⁷ (mediant) - Cmaj 7th (C•E•G•B) - *(BE - over C)  

iv⁷ (subdominant) - Dmin 7th (D•F•A•C) - *(CF - over D) 

v⁷ (dominant) - Emin 7th (E•G•B•D) - *(DG - over E)

VI⁷ (submediant) - Fmaj 7th (F•A•C•E) - *(EA - over F)  

VII⁷ (subtonic) - Gdom 7th (G•B•D•F) - *(FB - over G)

 

One of the most common chord progressions is I, IV, V (ii, V, I for jazz?) - but just recently I looked a little closer at Celtic-type tune backing & was surprised at how many different progressions I found!  ...never thought it could be different. 😳

Feels like I'm learning a strange new language! 

🤔... not Klingon!

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@elcbk said...

One of the most common chord progressions is I, IV, V (ii, V, I for jazz?) - but just recently I looked a little closer at Celtic-type tune backing & was surprised at how many different progressions I found!  ...never thought it could be different. 😳

Feels like I'm learning a strange new language! 

🤔... not Klingon!

Backing is a skill itself..just like playing melody and really has to be practiced.    In Irish especially, theres generally ONE person playing chords.   And its pretty well that persons choice on how to do it, which includes chords, tunings, rhythm style e.g. ( Dennis Cahill vs John Doyle ) 

Now.. Commercial recordings could have anything.  Im talking about maybe more practically speaking.   

Ignore that he uses a guitar...this isnt a guitar video...its about chord choices and why to use what. 

 

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@ABitRusty -

Thanks!  Really appreciate you helping me out!  

You, along with the video, bring up a bunch of stuff I've been thinking about (warning: RABBIT HOLE)! 😄  A LOT to take in - I definitely want to look at more of Nye's videos!

LOVE starting at 13:56: "you need to start thinking in a sort of contrapuntal sense" - "chords are melodies in their own right".   

Think we're beyond playing backup now → and into Arranging/Composing music!!!  Yep, & I've always wanted to see basslines & melody lines as interchangeable/mixable - eventually playing that way!  Choosing chords & how they are played seems important if playing like Roberts Balanas!  ("Pop songs with cool violin parts"...ah, if only... 😍😎

I was VERY excited to see how Nye used some extended chords, but until I can find or figure out how to easily 'imply' a chord larger than a 7th (context for bowed strings) - still keeping the quality/feeling of the chord while using less notes, I'm limited in backing with them!  Well, actually... 🤭 'I' can consider 5 note chords (5 strings!).  🤔... guess any larger, extended, chord CAN still be played broken on 4 strings, but not possible to break one down using only one bow stroke, though - is it?  If more than one bow stroke is needed for an extended chord, doesn't it lose the 'quality' of the original chord - and feel like more than one chord? 

 

Nye points out (at 2:45) - that as long as you play the root note lowest, the rest of the chord notes can be in ANY order.  THIS IS VERY INTERESTING! 

Answers one of my earlier questions (when playing on one instrument) - I need to not only play the tonic with my 'implied 7th' double stop, it also needs to be played in the root position!   🤔... so, this brings up more questions about extended chord inversions for me, because (from what I've read) they can NOT be thought of in the 'circular rotation' way I make triad & 7th chord inversions. 

Nye keeps the integrity, 'the base', of an extended chord - think this shows the way he deals with the idiosyncrasies of large inversions... but is the reason most fiddlers don't make a big deal of it because 'someone else', like a guitarist, is always expected to play that low root, or a bassline?

I'm still back to thinking of what's possible/more feasible (fingerings & size of chords) on violin/viola/cello - for most folks here on the forum. 

 

Another point I take from Nye's video - he is using a major I, IV, V progression for backing a major trad Irish tune. 

Do you, by chance, happen to know of anywhere Dennis Cahill talked about HIS chord progressions & chord choices?

Now, I had only looked at a couple places, so far, for Celtic cord progressions.  Interesting discussion at thesession.org - musicians were saying you'd be in trouble if you tried to stick to a I, IV, V for trad Irish (typical chord progressions for irish music?). 

Nye did answer someone asking about Celtic chord progressions, at the StackExchange:

• For ionian tunes the main chords are major, major and major

• For the dorian mode the main chords used are minor, major and major or minor

• For the mixolydian mode the main chords used are major, major and minor

• For the aeolian mode the main chords used are minor, major and major or minor.   

Did you see he advertises a very cool, "Amazing Mode Wheel"?  

I need to check it out!  (link in Nye's video description)  

4053b24cae7afc33ef7708a7303987f7-600x600.png

@ABitRusty said:

Backing is a skill itself..just like playing melody and really has to be practiced.    In Irish especially, theres generally ONE person playing chords. 

I'm just thinking like if 'I' want to join in with a fiddle. 

In fact, recently I've had to go back to 'practicing' more noodling against videos (I originally learned melodies from) - trying to make it feel/sound more natural, especially for better use of my looping pedal.  So, YES, I definitely know backing must be practiced & on a much longer-term basis than what I've been doing so far! 😔 ...I can see it's another thing I need to add to 'DAILY' practice, not just sporadic! 

 

giphy.gif

Hoping this thread will help me focus on a few simple things I can play, but which implies much more.

If I'm just playing the fiddle by myself, I have to think how to get the feel of some backing. 

So far, I have NO idea how to play ANY FAST trad Irish/Cape Breton/Québécois this way, unless I can play a double stop to imply a chord/chord change within the melody. 

Whew, really hope some of this makes sense & I don't have to edit!

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Nye has a couple of videos on what he feels Dennis did. Ill lead the topic off if start posting them all though

  Ive watched them but havent REALLY sat down and FOCUSED just on that.  Another good backer that too me has the less is more approach is Matt Heaton. He has some chord choices type vids out there too.  And I dont mean simple I mean more along the lines of space between strums.  Not so much driving type rhythm he does that too though.  To me John Doyle is the one for that.  

Dennis Cahill could do any of it as you know ...not saying anything thats a revelation 🙂 but seemed to lean more minimal or airy type playing.  not the full jazz chords all the time.. maybe even ONE note placed perfectly and in time with what Martin Hayes was playing. 

So maybe instead of thinking along the lines of how to play extended chords bowed... maybe somehow mix a bowed note(S) and some plucked notes in and out of same chord?   mix it up and dont worry about having every single bar with some type of backing?  a note here...a double stop there.   maybe a long sustained drone in between?  talking about backing irish melodies on fiddle..get into other genere then I would think the approach changes.

Maybe something else if wanting a ..say..Maj7 type would be to pluck or single note bow the root..then the 3rd and 5th... then single the 7th.  experiment.   related to celtic in my thought.. the initial 2 or 3 measures are more than likely going to be the tonic chord of whatevwr key/mode youre in so youd hqve time.   A safe start on the 4th measure will be the V.  this is where you could experiment with Dom7th. e.g.  D7 not Dmaj7 for a G tune.  I think a D5 would be better but you could try maybe playing 5th or 3rd with b7 and see how sounds against a melody line playing. 🙂  the last 2 measures is where the IV chord will probably come in. 

youve just gotta experiment with the melody playing on a speaker or headphone.   its really the best way.   do what your doing in REVERSE... Instead of trying to figure it out ahead of time.. play and experiment THEN when you find something that sounds good hit the books and figure out what it was and why  it worked.

Just throwing thoughts out...i havent really tried doing what your topic is about on fiddle so much.  trying to back with extended chords on fiddle. just thought id share the Nye vid because of its content and relation to your topic.  If i have a 2nd or 3rd fiddle part i just play around noodle to find something i like based on what chords ive already established as what i like using guitar or a keyboard part.

Have you tried learning inside of a bluegrass type apptoach?   I think youll find more there than in any celtic type vid as far as it being fiddle centric.  PLENTY of guitar stuff out there on that subject.   Maybe even look for jazz fiddle type stuff?

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@ABitRusty -

Thanks a bunch! 

I shouldn't be mixing thoughts of backing and soloing possibilities all together, but that's my brain on music - think we're basically on the same page. 

Trying to stop thinking like just a melody player has been taking me a long time, even after backing & improv workshops at Fiddle Hell. 

I have been practicing backing by improvising over a recording of a melody, but I don't do it enough.  And, I've slowly been experimenting with how to change melodies I've been playing, to make them richer & more interesting... just times I get impatient when I know it's a long haul. 

Looking closely at all the genres, some of the best ARE jazz violin and the blues for at least 7th chords.  I keep an eye out in Bluegrass, but not my favorite genre... and high speed will continue to be my nemesis, wherever it shows up. 🙄  

Trying to decide if I should spend time on a lesson package, when I'm still working on so much other stuff - maybe something for after Xmas.

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All still new to me, but this video (from Warren McPherson) helped me a lot, not only for understanding extended & altered chords, but it was important for me to hear how they sound.  I like he talks about the quality of the chords and why to modify them.  Also learned about 'flattening the 9th' note from him - to get a bluesy sound, like in Gospel music.  

Maybe good to watch before seeing how these chords are used on string instruments. 

How To Use Altered Extended Chords  (Warren McPherson) 

https://youtu.be/5S_AD12DUyY

 

@Strabo -

Thank you, SO MUCH, for bringing up the subject of '13th Chords' in the What Is a Stomp Thread!!! 

A 13th chord. 

It's basically a 2 consecutive octave arpeggio.  Easier to visualize on piano: this extended chord is a much nicer sounding way to use ALL the notes of a scale, because the intervals are farther apart!  It's AMAZING!  All the notes of a ONE OCTAVE SCALE, but spread over TWO OCTAVES! 

13thChordpianokeys.jpgImage Enlarger

Like other chords, it can be inverted, diminished, augmented, etc... even thought of as 2 separate chords - upper structure & lower structure.  Some people leave out the 11th note & flatten the 7th for a Dominant chord - it's all about what you want to hear or what you want to play over it. 

As far as playing on a chord instrument, fatter (extended) chords sound richer and can add more interest to accompaniment, but (as far as I can tell) they don't upset your I, IV, V progressions - they just add 'color' by what voicing you choose. 

I have a long ways to go here, but looking at a 13th Chord on a keyboard (relating it to the fiddle) makes me think I can improvise in & around the smaller chords that I see within it (3 & 4 note chords, plus inversions) - a mind-boggling amount of possibilities!  I've also been exploring how to 'imply' the feeling of extended chords with less notes. 

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...transplanted this post from the Intervals Thread, because these videos help show what's important about 7th and extended chords.  

#horror from Every day is Halloween

What happens when intervals battle? 

"The PSYCHO Chord!" 

 

🎃  💀  🦉  🎃  👻  🦇  🎃

What is the most dissonant interval? 

 

https://images.creativemarket.com/0.1.0/ps/5025436/1820/1213/m1/fpnw/wm0/d9zgc4gkxhvdti1st2ixxavtj4b5ck6e9q10qjg9fra91zlyv2tpisbhafl4xxi6-.jpg?1536584367&s=a43feab1b0271451fb52fc1a2081c322

- Emily

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Jeez, this thread makes me think I might really have "Expressive Language Disorder" 😳 my thoughts are jumping all over the place! 🥴 

Okay, new perspective...  

This really starts with Intervals - why?

An interval may be described as horizontal, linear, or melodic if it refers to successively sounding tones, such as two adjacent pitches in a melody, and vertical or harmonic if it pertains to simultaneously sounding tones, such as in a chord. (Wikipedia)

I want to be able to identify (and learn how to use) the harmony relationship between the intervals of melody & accompaniment, or bassline.  I thought by learning about 'Seventh, Altered & Extended Chord Harmony', this would be my bridge to connecting them all together. 

  1. I can hear & see the difference between Triad chord types (Major, Minor, Diminished & Augmented). 
  2. (edited, listened more!) I can hear & see the difference between Triad Inversions, as easily.  Where I can run into trouble is seeing these in notation (unless stacked 'closed'), because the intervals are no longer all 3rds. 
  3. I definitely hear 7th chords have more character than triads - and I hear more difference between inversions.  I can usually identify an inversion in notation where the chord is stacked, because the half-step interval stands out... but it could also be something other than a 7th chord - there could be more notes in the bassline to consider. 

I've still been viewing notation in Treble Clef, Alto Clef, & Bass Clef as 'separate entities' in scores - far too often.  It might be more important (for me, right now) to concentrate on just learning to recognize/identify the forms 7th chords in notation, but then I need to start looking at the Treble Clef (or Alto Clef) together with the Bass Clef in some scores - as ONE, overall harmony.  Pretty sure this connection will help me identify the chord progressions better, too. 

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Those are fun.  the pressure!! 🫠  why are they saying stuff like major 7 on or over C?  instead of normal CMaj7 or C major 7..  or for a dominant. c7..  works i guess..but seems not a usual way of naming.

 

I think this is a good one to start recognizing the sound of a dominant vs Major7.   He keeps it in C and isnt concerned with naming the exact chord...just whether its dominant or major.  And if trying to figure out a progression is a helpful approach because once you hear those differences you can figure out WHAT maj7 or dominant it likely is by what key youre in.  

 

Gonna check his channel for more types.   need to work on this type of stuff more!  

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ABitRusty said
Those are fun.  the pressure!! 🫠  why are they saying stuff like major 7 on or over C?  instead of normal CMaj7 or C major 7..  or for a dominant. c7..  works i guess..but seems not a usual way of naming.

Yeah, this can be confusing (for me).

I actually thought it was easy, once I realized their terminology just pointed out the root shown notated - at least they were consistent through the whole quiz.  

I thought it was going to be harder & try to trip me up - because I've read & heard in videos that to be 'in the key of C', the dominant 7th is supposed to be built on the 5th scale degree (dominant).  The dominant 7th chord in C is really G7 (root G)... so, I screwed up the 1st one - said it was the Cdom7th chord. 😔  ...still, not sure if there's a hard/fast rule thinking about this.

Thanks for the video! 

I REALLY NEED help to associate the 'hearing' with 'seeing' these chords voiced in standard notation. 

I'm having such a problem making a connection between playing what I hear and the reason why.  I keep slipping into 'auto mode' lately, just playing what sounds I hear.  Even if I say what it is out loud, the chord (even just notes) feel like they just have no meaning.  

So far, this video is great... except there's a spot (2:14) where he talks about some inversions (and shows the notation!), BUT NO SOUND with those 🤬 (?)  Seventh Chords - Music Theory Crash Course (Odd Quartet)

'Odd Quartet' does have 2 other videos on building 7th Chords (thought I was saved).  My problem with this 1st one (haven't watched the 2nd yet), is he says you can assume the key signature from the root of the chord - as I stated above, I don't think that's always true!   

How to Build Seventh Chords

 

...that was the best I found for listening while viewing the notation (so far).

Come on, all you piano-playing folks - weigh in here, PLEASE! 

If I just see a G7 chord in notation -

couldn't it be the dominant 7th chord of the C major scale?  

...a Cmaj Key Signature?

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ABitRusty
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October 5, 2023 - 6:03 am
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oh im not confused 🙂..i think the video is.   

Theres a way chords are named...i think they shouldve used it.

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ELCBK
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@ABitRusty -

Edited... meant confusing 'for me'. 

I certainly agree with you about C⁷ being the most common way of naming a 'C dominant 7th' chord (from what I've seen) - I'm gonna to stick with it. 😊

Just watched a couple videos that cleared up my confusion about building (vs naming) Dominant 7th Chords... amazing how a few words can change my perspective.  

So, even though a Dominant 7th Chord can be built on any note - in each scale it 'occurs naturally' built on the 5th (dominant scale degree).  This would be G⁷ on the C Major Scale

The notes of a Dominant 7th Chord occur 'naturally' in the Mixolydian Mode (the 7th is flatted)... this little added tidbit will now help me remember this mode. 🤗 

Wish I would've found these videos on 7th Chords right from the start: 

The Five Minute Mozart "Seventh Chord" Videos: Simple explanations.  EXCELLENT for hearing AND seeing the intervals as these chords are built, but there's also additional videos here on Intervals and Modes worth using for a combination of listening while seeing in notation.

Music With Myles uses a similar approach, but emphasizes chord quality & function!  He kicks these 7th chords up to what I've wanted all along, because if I can't see 'what they're good for' or how to use them... 

Think I've mentioned elsewhere - I LOVE DIMINISHED SEVENTH CHORDS

...soooooo DARK!

 

Related: Chord Progressions for Improv Thread

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Gordon Shumway
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October 5, 2023 - 5:33 pm
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The dominant is the 5th note of a scale. So C is the dominant of F major.

CEGBb I'd just call C7, unless it's going to resolve into F major, of which it is the dominant.

For instance, you could have a song in G major which has the chord sequence G,C7,G,C7,G

Andrew

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ABitRusty
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@elcbk said..I certainly agree with you about C⁷ being the most common way of naming a 'C dominant 7th' chord (from what I've seen) - I'm gonna to stick with it. 

Its the only way, now anyway...im sure out there somewhere is an example of another..  Its a C dominant 7th Chord.. but its written C7.   you wont miss out on anything short change your learning by learning it like this.

and you dont HAVE to use a dominant 7th when plying back to the I chord.   it really depends on the style of music and the aound youre wanting.  Playing around with different progressions on sites like strum machine or even by notating them out in musescore is a way to learn the sounds more.

The notes of a Dominant 7th Chord occur 'naturally' in the Mixolydian Mode (the 7th is flatted)... this little added tidbit will now help me remember this mode

because the V7 ( dominant 7th ) is now functioning as the I (one chord) in that mode.   Well it really brings out that feel.  As a general statement.  

edit..later...after finding an example for you

he 'splains it better..

 

i think relating to major scale helps.  but thats the way i learned it so i would. 🙂

 

i think the study of chord progressions is a thing itself.  you really can get deep.  wish i had time in the day to do that.

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ELCBK
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81bfe704bcbc2dc9beb0cf1610eae6ee.jpg

 

@ABitRusty -

Enjoyed the video, helps - Thanx! 

Had a little laugh near the end, where he says he wouldn't recommend composing anything in Mixolydian, because it would be limiting. 

...all those Highland bagpipe tunes. 🎃

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